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WEST VIRGINIA’S C H I L D R E N
West Virginia’s Children At a Glance1 State Population2……………….……1,855,364
Population, Children Under 183…….386,831
State Poverty Rate4…………….……18.6%
Poverty Rate, Children Under 185……25.8%
Poverty Rate, Children Ages 5–176…..23.5%
Poverty Rate, Children Under 57…..30.1%
CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT •
In 2011, West Virginia had 33,445 total referrals for child abuse and neglect. Of those, 17,225 reports were referred for
investigation.8
•
In 2011, 4,000 children were victims of abuse or neglect in West Virginia, a rate of 10.4 per 1,000 children, representing
a 3.3% decrease from 2010. Of these children, 53.4% were neglected, 34.3% were physically abused, and 4.4% were
sexually abused.9
•
The number of child victims has decreased 43.7% in comparison to the number of victims in 2007.10
•
In 2011, 16 children in West Virginia died as a result of abuse or neglect.11
•
In 2011, 4,475 children in West Virginia lived apart from their families in out-of-home care, compared with 4,097
children in 2010. In 2011, 1,568 of the children living apart from their families were age 5 or younger, and 607 were 16
or older.12
•
The number of children living apart from their families in out-of-home care has increased 1.0% in comparison to the
number of children in out-of-home care in 2007.13
•
Of West Virginia children in out-of-home care in 2011, 85.4% were white, 4.7% black, 1.4% Hispanic, 0.0% American
Indian/Alaskan Native, 0.1% Asian or Pacific Islander and 7.2% of more than one race or ethnicity.14
ADOPTION, KINSHIP CARE, AND PERMANENT FAMILIES FOR CHILDREN •
Of the 3,030 children exiting out-of-home care in West Virginia in 2011, 61.3% were reunited with their parents or other
family members.15
•
In 2011, 698 children were legally adopted through the public child welfare agency in West Virginia, a 5.4% increase
from 662 in 2010.16
•
Of the 4,475 children in out-of-home care in 2011, 1,436 or 32.1% were waiting to be adopted.17
•
In 2011, approximately 20,354 West Virginia grandparents had primary responsibility caring for their grandchildren.18
•
Of the 4,475 children in out-of-home care in 2011, 745 were living with relatives while in care.19
•
Of all West Virginia children in kinship care in 2010, 14.4% were white, 0.7% black, 0.1% Hispanic, 0.0% American
Indian/Alaskan Native, 0.0% Asian or Pacific Islander, and 0.7% of more than one race or ethnicity.20
CHILD POVERTY AND INCOME SUPPORT •
The total number of individuals receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) in West Virginia increased
from 21,808 in 2010 to 23,642 in 2011, an increase of 8.4%. The number of families receiving TANF in 2011 was
10,376, a 6.6% increase from 2010.21
•
From 2009-10, for every 100 West Virginia families living in poverty, only 21 received TANF benefits.22
•
In 2011, $171,955,410 was spent in West Virginia on TANF assistance, including 20% on basic assistance, 3% on child
care, 9% on transportation, and 57% on nonassistance.23
1
1726 M Street NW, Suite 500 • Washington, DC 20036 • 202‐688‐4200 • www.cwla.org •
In 2011, 27,046,481 was spent on WIC (the Special Supplement Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children) in
West Virginia, serving 49,117 participants.24
•
In 2011, West Virginia distributed $190,074,463 in child support funds, a 7.1% decrease from 2010.25
•
In 2011 in West Virginia, 41,046 low income renter households paid more than half their monthly income in housing
costs, 27% of them are families with children.26
CHILD CARE AND HEAD START •
In 2010, West Virginia had a monthly average of 9,100 children served by subsidized child care; 7,000 children received
subsidized child care in 2009 and 8,300 in 2008.27
•
In 2012, to be eligible for subsidized child care in West Virginia, a family of three could make no more than $27,792,
which is equivalent to 56% of the state’s median income.28
•
As of early 2012, West Virginia had no waiting list for child care assistance.29
•
In 2011, Head Start served 8,234 West Virginia children, a 8.2% increase from 2010.30
HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE •
In 2011, 171,000 children younger than 19 were enrolled in Medicaid in West Virginia—51% of the total number of
enrollees in the state.31
•
In 2011, West Virginia had 37,631 children enrolled in its State Children’s Health Insurance Program, a 0.2% increase
from 2010, when 37,539 children were enrolled.32
•
In 2011, West Virginia had 37,000 uninsured children, representing 10% of its child population.33
•
In 2010, 1,880 babies were born weighing less than 2,500 grams in West Virginia.34
•
In 2010, 150 infants under age 1 died in West Virginia.35
•
In 2010, the birth rate for teens 15–17 in West Virginia was 21 births per 1,000 girls; for teens 18–19, the rate was 76.
This reflects a total rate of 45 births per 1,000 girls ages 15–19.36
•
Cumulative through 2011, 1,898 adults and adolescents, as well as 11 children younger than 13, were reported as having
AIDS in West Virginia.37
•
In 2009 and 2010, an estimated 8,000 children ages 12–17 and 110,000 adults age 18 and older were dependent on or
abusing illicit drugs or alcohol in West Virginia.38
VULNERABLE YOUTH •
In 2011, 53 children aged out of out-of-home care—exited foster care to emancipation—in West Virginia.39
•
In 2011, 11,000 West Virginia teens ages 16–19 were not enrolled in school and were not working.40
•
In 2011, 39,000 young adults ages 18–24 were not enrolled in school, were not working, and had no degree beyond high
school.41
•
In 2009 and 2010, approximately 4,000 children ages 12–17 in West Virginia needed but had not received treatment for
illicit drug use in the past year.42
•
In 2009 and 2010, approximately 5,000 children ages 12–17 needed but had not received treatment for alcohol use in the
past year.43
•
In 2010, 10 West Virginia children younger than 20 committed suicide, a rate of 2.28 per 100,000 children.44
2
1726 M Street NW, Suite 500 • Washington, DC 20036 • 202‐688‐4200 • www.cwla.org JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION •
In 2010, 11 children under age 19 were killed by a firearm in West Virginia, a 27% decrease from 15 in 2009.45
•
In 2011, 1,882 children younger than 18 were arrested in West Virginia, a 4.0% decrease from 1,954 arrests in 2010. Of
the arrests in 2011, 80 were for violent crimes.46
•
In 2010, 561 children lived in juvenile correction facilities in West Virginia.47
CHILD WELFARE WORKFORCE48 •
A 2003 General Accounting Office (GAO) report documented that staff shortages, high caseloads, high worker turnover
and low salaries impinge on delivering services to achieve safety, permanence, and well being for children.49
•
The federal Child and Family Service Reviews have clearly demonstrated that the more time a caseworker spends with a
child and family, the better the outcomes for those children and families.50
•
According to the 2003 GAO report, the average caseload for child welfare/foster care caseworkers is 24–31 children;
these high caseloads contribute to high worker turnover and insufficient services being provided to children and families.
CWLA recommends that foster care caseworkers have caseloads of 12–15 children.51
FUNDING CHILD WELFARE SERVICES FOR WEST VIRGINIA’S CHILDREN •
Out of 4,475 children in out-of-home care in West Virginia in 2011, only 870, or 19%, received Title IV-E federal foster
care assistance.52
•
In 2010, West Virginia spent $305,609,337 for child welfare services. Of this amount, $182,505,175 was from federal
funds, $123,104,162 from state funds, and $0 from local funds.53
•
In 2010, of the $182,505,175 in federal funds received for child welfare, $57,473,373 was from Title IV-E Foster Care
and Adoption Assistance, $4,427,964 came from Title IV-B Child Welfare Services and Promoting Safe and Stable
Families, $ was from Medicaid, $21,071,758 came from Social Services Block Grant, $99,158,679 was from TANF, and
$373,401 came from other federal sources.54
•
West Virginia received $19,690,558 in federal funds for IV-E foster care expenditures in 2011, including $13,911,074
for maintenance payments, $3,609,400 for administration and child placement, $1,745,109 for the statewide automated
child welfare information system, and $597,541 for training.55
•
West Virginia received $18,763,735 in federal funds for IV-E adoption assistance expenditures in 2011, including
$17,227,720 for assistance payments, $354,847 for administration and child placement, and $1,181,168 for staff and
provider training.56
3
1726 M Street NW, Suite 500 • Washington, DC 20036 • 202‐688‐4200 • www.cwla.org Governor: Earl Ray Tomblin (D)
www.wv.gov
1900 Kanawha Boulevard, E., Charleston, WV 25305
Next Election: 2016
Tel: 1-888-438-2731
Phone
Fax
Website
Next
Election
303 Hart
224-3954
228-0002
Manchin.senate.gov
2018
John D. “Jay” Rockefeller,
IV (D)
531 Hart
Finance
224-6472
224-7665
Rockefeller.senate.gov
2014
Office
Senate:
Joe Manchin, III (D)
House:
David McKinley (R-1st)
Energy & Commerce
412 Cannon
225-4172
225-7564
Mckinley.house.gov
2014
Shelley Moore Capito (R2nd)
2366 Rayburn
225-2711
225-7856
Capito.house.gov
2014
Nick J. Rahall, II (D-3rd)
2307 Rayburn
225-3452
225-9061
Rahall.house.gov
2014
Key Committee Jurisdictions
Senate H.E.L.P.: CAPTA; Child Care & Head Start; ESEA
Senate Judiciary: Juvenile Justice
Senate Finance: Child Welfare Reform; Medicaid & Mental Health; SSBG Child Welfare Services & Promoting
Safe and Stable Families; TANF
House Education & the Workforce: CAPTA; Child Care & Head Start; ESEA
House Judiciary: Juvenile Justice
House Ways & Means: Child Welfare Reform, SSBG, CWS & PSSF, TANF
House Energy & Commerce: Medicaid & Mental Health
4
1726 M Street NW, Suite 500 • Washington, DC 20036 • 202‐688‐4200 • www.cwla.org NOTES AND REFERENCES
1
“At A Glance” statistics are from 2011.
U.S. Census Bureau (2011). Quick Links to Nation or State level Profiles: ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates: 2011 American Community Survey
1-year estimates. Retrieved on January 18, 2013 from http://www.census.gov/acs/www/.
3
Ibid.
4
U.S. Census Bureau (2011). Quick Links to Nation or State level Profiles: Selected Economic Characteristics, 2011 American Community Survey 1-year
estimates. Retrieved January 18, 2013 from http://www.census.gov/acs/www/.
5
Ibid.
6
Ibid
7
Ibid.
8
Administration on Children, Youth, and Families. (2012). Child Maltreatment 2011: Reports from the States to the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data
System: Table 2-1: Screened-In and Screened-Out Referrals, 2011. Retrieved January 23, 2013 from http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/cb/cm11.pdf.
9
Administration on Children, Youth, and Families. (2012). Child Maltreatment 2012: Report from the States to the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data
System: Table 3-3: Child Victims, 2011 & Table 3-8: Maltreatment Types of Victims, 2011. Retrieved February 13, 2013 from
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/cb/cm11.pdf
Note: The percent difference is a CWLA calculation.
10
Administration on Children, Youth, and Families. (2012). Child Maltreatment 2011: Reports from the States to the National Child Abuse and Neglect
Data System: Table 3-3: Child Victims, 2011. Retrieved January 25, 2013 from http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/cb/cm11.pdf.
Administration on Children, Youth, and Families. (2007). Child Maltreatment 2007: Reports from the States to the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data
System: Table 3-3: Victimization Rates, 2003-2007. Retrieved February 11, 2013 from http://archive.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/pubs/cm07/cm07.pdf.
Note: The percentage difference is a CWLA calculation.
11
Administration on Children, Youth, and Families. (2012). Child Maltreatment 2011: Reports from the States to the National Child Abuse and Neglect
Data System: Table 4-2, Child Fatalities, 2007-2011. Retrieved January 25, 2013 from http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/cb/cm11.pdf.
12
Special tabulation of the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis Reporting System (AFCARS) by National Data Archive for Child Abuse and Neglect
(NDACAN) and CWLA.
13
Administration on Children, Youth, and Families (n.d.). Foster Care FY2003-FY2011 Entries, Exits, and Numbers of Children In Care on the Last Day of
Each Federal Fiscal year. Retrieved February 11, 2013 from http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/cb/entryexit2011.pdf.
Note: The percent difference is a CWLA calculation.
14
Special tabulation of AFCARS by NDACAN and CWLA.
15
Special tabulation of AFCARS by NDACAN and CWLA.
16
Administration for Children and Families. (2012). Adoptions of children with public child welfare agency involvement by state. Retrieved February 11,
2013 from http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/cb/adoptchild11.pdf.
Note: The percent difference is a CWLA calculation.
17
Special tabulation of AFCARS by NDACAN and CWLA.
18
U.S. Census Bureau. (2011). Quick Links to Nation or State level Profiles: American Community Survey, Data Profile. Selected Social Characteristics in
the United States: 2011. Retrieved February 11, 2013 from http://www.census.gov/acs/www/.
19
Special tabulation of AFCARS by NDACAN and CWLA.
20
Ibid. Note: Total percentage may not equal 100 because the race/ethnicity of some children was not reported or missing. Percentages are a CWLA
calculation.
21
U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Family Assistance. (2012).TANF: Total Number of Recipients. Retrieved February 11, 2013
from http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofa/resource/2011-recipient-tan .
U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Family Assistance. (2011). TANF: Total Number of Recipients. Retrieved February 11, 2013 from
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofa/resource/2010-recipients-tanf.
Note: The percent differences are CWLA special tabulations.
22
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (2012) TANF Weakening as a Safety Net for Poor Families: Appendix Table B1: TANF Cases to Families with
Children in Poverty Ratios, 1994-95 to 2009-10. Retrieved January 30, 2013 from http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3700.
23
Administration for Children and Families. (2012). Fiscal Year 2011 TANF Financial Data: Table B.1: Summary of Federal TANF and State MOE
Expenditures in FY 2011. Retrieved January 30, 2013 from http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofa/resource/tanf-financial-data-fy-2011.
Administration for Children and Families. (2012). Fiscal Year 2010 TANF Financial Data: Table B.2: Federal TANF and State MOE Expenditures on
Assistance in FY2011. Retrieved December 21, 2011 from http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofa/resource/tanf-financial-data-fy-2011.
Administration for Children and Families. (2012). Fiscal Year 2010 TANF Financial Data: Table B.3: Federal TANF and State MOE Expenditures on NonAssistance in FY 2011. Retrieved December 21, 2011 from http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ofa/resource/tanf-financial-data-fy-2011.
Note: The percents are a CWLA calculation.
24
Food and Nutrition Service. (2013). Program Data: WIC Program: Food Costs . Retrieved January 30, 2013 from
http://www.fns.usda.gov/pd/24wicfood$.htm.
Food and Nutrition Service. (2013). Program Data: WIC Program: Total Participation. Retrieved January 30, 2013 from
http://www.fns.usda.gov/pd/26wifypart.htm.
Note: All program data can be accessed at http://www.fns.usda.gov/pd/wicmain.htm.
25
Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Support Enforcement. (2012). Preliminary Report FY 2011: State Boxscores for FY 2011.
Retrieved January 30, 2013 from http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/css/resource/fy2011-preliminary-report-state-box-scores.
2
5
1726 M Street NW, Suite 500 • Washington, DC 20036 • 202‐688‐4200 • www.cwla.org 26
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. (2011). National and State Housing Data Factsheet, Spreadsheet with State-by-State Rental Assistance Data:
Federal Rental Assistance in the United States and U.S. Territories. Retrieved January 30, 2013 from
http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3586.
Note: Factsheet retrieved from http://www.cbpp.org/files/2011-state-fact-sheets-public.xls and data tabulated by CBPP from 2011 American Community
Survey data.
27
Administration on Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2011). 2010 CCDF Data Tables (Preliminary Estimates); Table 1: Average Monthly
Adjusted Number of Children and Families Served. Retrieved January 30, 2013 from http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/occ/resource/ccdf-data-10acf800preliminary.
Administration on Children and Families, Office of Child Care (2011). 2009 CCDF Data Tables (Final); Table 1: Average Monthly Adjusted Number of
Children and Families Served. Retrieved January 30, 2013 from http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/occ/resource/ccdf-data-09acf800-final.
Administration on Children and Families, Office of Child Care. (2010). FFY 2008 CCDF Data Tables (Final) Table 1: Average Monthly Adjusted Number
of Children and Families Served. Retrieved January 30, 2013 from http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/occ/resource/ccdf-data-08acf800-final.
28
Schulman, K. & Blank, H. (2012). State Child Care Assistance Policies 2012: Reduced Support for Families in Challenging Times: Table 1A: Income
Eligibility Limits for a Family of Three in 2011 and 2012. Retrieved February 11, 2013 from
http://www.nwlc.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/NWLC2012_StateChildCareAssistanceReport.pdf.
29
Schulman, K. & Blank, H. (2012). State Child Care Assistance Policies 2012: Reduced Support for Families in Challenging Times: Table 2: Waiting Lists
for Child Care Assistance. Retrieved February 11, 2013 from http://www.nwlc.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/NWLC2012_StateChildCareAssistanceReport.pdf.
30
Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start. (2012). Head Start Program Fact Sheet, Fiscal Year 2011. Retrieved February 13, 2013
from http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/mr/factsheets/2011-hs-program-factsheet.html.
Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start. (2011). Head Start Program Fact Sheet, Fiscal Year 2010. Retrieved February 13, 2013
from http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/mr/factsheets/fHeadStartProgr.htm.
Note: The percent difference is a CWLA calculation.
31
Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation . (2012). Monthly Medicaid Enrollment for Children (in thousands). Retrieved February 20, 2013 from
http://www.statehealthfacts.org/comparemaptable.jsp?ind=612&cat=4.
Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. (2012.) Monthly Medicaid Enrollment (in thousands). Retrieved February 20, 2013 from
http://www.statehealthfacts.org/comparemaptable.jsp?ind=774&cat=4
32
Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services. (2012.). FY 2011 Number of Children Ever Enrolled Year-CHIP by Program Type . Retrieved March 7, 2013
from http://www.medicaid.gov/Medicaid-CHIP-Program-Information/By-Topics/Childrens-Health-Insurance-ProgramCHIP/Downloads/FY_2011_State_Total_CHIP-Table_-final_02102012.pdf
33
U.S. Census Bureau. (2012). Table HIB-5. Health Insurance Coverage Status and Type of Coverage by State—Children Under 18: 1999 to 2011.
Retrieved March 1, 2013 from http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/hlthins/data/historical/files/hihistt5B.xls
34
Annie E. Casey Foundation. (n.d.). Kids Count. Data Across States: Rankings/Maps/Trends by Topic: Low-birth weight babies (Number)- 2010. Retrieved
March 1, 2013 from. http://datacenter.kidscount.org/data/acrossstates/Rankings.aspx?loct=2&by=a&order=a&ind=5425&dtm=11984&tf=133.
35
Murphy, S., Xu, J., & Kochanek, K . (2012). National Vital Statistics Report: Deaths: Preliminary Data for 2010- Table I. Total count of records and
percent completeness of preliminary files of infant deaths and deaths to those aged 1 year and over: United States, each state and territory, preliminary 2010.
Retrieved March 7, 2013 from http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr60/nvsr60_04.pdf.
36
Martin, J., Hamilton, B., Ventura, S., Osterman, M., Wilson, E., Mathew, T.J.. (2012). National Vital Statistics Report: Births: Final Data for 2010- Table
12. Birth rate, by age of mother : United States, each state and territory, 2010.–. Retrieved March 7, 2013 from
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr61/nvsr61_01.pdf.
37
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2011). HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, 2011. Vol. 23: Table 20: Stage 3 (AIDS), by area of residence, 2011
and cumulative—United States and 6 dependent areas. Retrieved March 1, 2013 from
http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/surveillance/resources/reports/2011report/pdf/2011_HIV_Surveillance_Report_vol_23.pdf#Page=69
38
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. (n.d.). State Estimates of Substance Use & Mental Health from
the 2009-2010 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health: Table 20-.Dependence or Abuse of Illicit Drugs or Alcohol in the Past Year, by Age Group and
State: Estimated Numbers (in Thousands), Annual Averages Based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs
Retrieved March 1, 2013 from http://www.samhsa.gov/data/NSDUH/2k10State/NSDUHsae2010/NSDUHsaeCountTabs2010.htm.
39
Special tabulation of AFCARS by NDACAN and CWLA.
40
Annie E. Casey Foundation. (n.d.). Kids Count: Data Across States: Rankings/Maps/Trends by Topic: Teens ages 16 to 19 not attending school and not
working (Number) - 2011. Retrieved February 14, 2013 from
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/data/acrossstates/Rankings.aspx?loct=2&by=a&order=a&ind=5062&dtm=11482&tf=867.
41
Annie E. Casey Foundation (n.d.). Kids Count. Data Across States: Rankings/Maps/Trends by Topic: Persons Age 18–24 not attending school, not
working, and no degree beyond High School (Number) - 2011. Retrieved February 14, 2013 from
http://datacenter.kidscount.org/data/acrossstates/Rankings.aspx?loct=2&by=a&order=a&ind=5063&dtm=11484&tf=867.
42
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. (n.d.). State Estimates of Substance Use & Mental Health from
the 2009-2010 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health: Table 21-Needing But Not Receiving Treatment for Illicit Drug Use in the Past Year, by Age
Group and State: Estimated Numbers (in Thousands), Annual Averages Based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. Retrieved February 20, 2013 from
http://www.samhsa.gov/data/NSDUH/2k10State/NSDUHsae2010/NSDUHsaeCountTabs2010.htm.
43
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. (n.d.). State Estimates of Substance Use & Mental Health from
the 2009-2010 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health: Table 22 - Needing But Not Receiving Treatment for Alcohol Use in the Past Year, by Age Group
and State: Estimated Numbers (in Thousands), Annual Averages Based on 2009 and 2010 NSDUHs. Retrieved February 20, 2013 from
http://www.samhsa.gov/data/NSDUH/2k10State/NSDUHsae2010/NSDUHsaeCountTabs2010.htm.
44
National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: Data & Statistics (WISQARS). (n.d.). Suicide Injury Deaths and Rates per 100,000: All Races, Both
Sexes, Ages 0 to 19. Retrieved March 13, 2013, from http://www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/fatal_injury_reports.html.
45
National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: Data & Statistics (WISQARS). (n.d.). Firearm Deaths and Rates per 100,000: All Races, Both Sexes,
Ages 0 to 19. Retrieved March 18, 2013 from http://www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/fatal_injury_reports.html.
Note: The percent difference is a CWLA calculation.
6
1726 M Street NW, Suite 500 • Washington, DC 20036 • 202‐688‐4200 • www.cwla.org 46
Federal Bureau of Investigation. (2012). Crime in the United States 2011: Table 69: Arrests by State, 2011. Retrieved February 27, 2013 from
http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2011/crime-in-the-u.s.-2011/tables/table_69_arrest_by_state_2011.xls.
Federal Bureau of Investigation. (2011). Crime in the United States 2010: Arrests by States, 2010. Retrieved February 27, 2013 from .
http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2010/crime-in-the-u.s.-2010/tables/10tbl69.xls.
Note: The percent difference is a CWLA calculation.
47
Sickmund, M., Sladky, T.J., Kang, W., & Puzzanchera, C. (2011). Easy Access to the Census of Juveniles in Residential Placement. Retrieved February
14, 2013 from www.ojjdp.gov/ojstatbb/ezacjrp.
48
Note: The dearth in current state-by-state workforce data makes clear the need for critical data on compensation, working conditions including safety
issues, academic degrees held, education and training received, and factors contributing to turnover. To address this, CWLA is calling for Congress to
authorize the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to conduct an updated study on the child welfare workforce. It would make recommendations regarding
caseloads and workloads, education levels, and training requirements. In addition, the study would examine data reporting and collection and make
recommendations on how states might improve these efforts.
49
U.S. General Accounting Office. (2003). Child Welfare: HHS Could Play a Greater Role in Helping Child Welfare Agencies Recruit and Retain Staff.
Retrieved January 19, 2012 from www.gao.gov/new.items/d03357.pdf.
50
Ibid.
51
Ibid.
52
Administration on Children, Youth, and Families (2012). Foster Care FY2003–FY2011 Entries, Exits, and Numbers of Children In Care on the Last Day
of Each Federal Fiscal year. Retrieved February 28, 2013 from http://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/cb/entryexit2011.pdf.
Note: The penetration rate is a CWLA calculation of special Children’s Bureau data on state IV-E Foster Care expenditures.
53
DeVooght, K., Fletcher, M, Vaughn, B., & Cooper, H. (2012). Federal, State, and Local Spending to Address Child Abuse and Neglect in SFYs 2008 and
2010. Washington, DC: Child Trends. Retrieved March 18, 2013 from http://www.childtrends.org/Files/Child_Trends2012_06_20_FR_CaseyCWFinancing.pdf.
54
Ibid.
55
Special Children’s Bureau data on state IV-E Foster Care and Adoption Assistance.
Note: The component funding streams may not equal the total, depending on additional child support, pre-placement, and demonstration funds for this state.
56
Ibid.
Note: The component funding streams may not equal the total, depending on additional partner training funds.
7
1726 M Street NW, Suite 500 • Washington, DC 20036 • 202‐688‐4200 • www.cwla.org 
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