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Annual Report 2014 - Almond Board Australia

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Almond Board of
Australia
ANNUAL REPORT 2013/14
1
2
Contents
4
Chairman’s Report
6
CEO’s Report
8
Almond Board of Australia
9
Industry Structure
10
ABA Board
12
ABA Staff
13Sub-Committees
15
Market Development Report
19
Financial Reports
35 Almond Industry Advisory Committee Annual Report 2013/14
The Almond Board of Australia (ABA) is the peak industry body for Australian almonds.
The ABA operates as a not-for-profit, membership based organisation representing the
interests of Australian almond growers, processors and marketers.
3
CHAIRMAN’S REPORT
In 2012/13 the Australian almond industry came of
age in terms of tonnes produced. This past year,
our industry came of age in terms of sales value
with export sales of almonds reaching $468 million
and when combined with domestic sales the value
pushed beyond $600 million. The average monthly
export price in July 2012 was $5.38, in July 2013
it was $7.59 and July this year it was $8.66 and
was trending upwards. The market is showing a
resilience of demand during this period of increasing
prices. Underpinning this demand are taste, product
versatility and the many health benefits of the regular
consumption of almonds.
by the high prices on offer. The ABA review of the
season found cropping levels varied from good to
poor with the overall result being 15,000 tonnes short
of the predicted level. The review forum conducted
by the ABA has provided some insights into issues
that can be addressed by producers but as with other
agricultural crops many uncontrollable factors do
impact on yields.
Health studies relating to heart disease, cancer
prevention, respiratory system illness, diabetes and
weight management show the benefits of eating
a handful of almonds several times a week. These
studies provide wonderful support for the marketing
of almonds in a world where consumers are actively
seeking information on the products they are eating
and feeding their families.
The industry is also entering a significant expansion
phase with increased plantings on both existing
properties and green field sites. The benefits to
the communities in the producing regions of an
expanding almond industry will be seen well into the
future based on the sound fundamentals that are in
place. To assist new entrants, the ABA has produced
a publication to guide inexperienced growers.
During the year, almonds received a five star rating
for both raw and roasted product, the highest in the
Government’s new star rating system for food in
Australia. The ABA is continuously active in putting
this information before the eyes of consumers.
A major project for the ABA has been the development
of the Almond Centre of Excellence to provide new
research capacity to undertake both pressing issues
such as insect control, mummy reduction, hull rot
management etc. whilst also looking to develop new
orchard systems for future plantings. We hope to be
able to provide a further update on this at the Annual
Conference to be held October 28-30 in Adelaide
where record registrations have been received.
The other drivers of demand for almonds are taste
and versatility. Magazines, newspapers and celebrity
cooking programs all frequently use almonds as an
ingredient in the recipes being presented.
Our 2014 crop was disappointing and made more so
4
The potential is there for an improved yield in 2015
following the excellent pollination period. Let us
hope the expectation of a record industry tonnage is
realised next year.
The review of Horticulture Australia Ltd. Has led to
Minister Joyce’s decision to develop a new R&D
CHAIRMAN’S REPORT
funding body called Horticulture Innovation Australia
Ltd (HIAL). The new body is to have a different
matching funding model and membership base. The
new arrangement has implications for how research
information and technologies, that are required
to implement the industry’s strategic plan, will be
delivered and the capacity of the ABA to monitor
work in progress and drive the implementation of
research outputs. Growers rather than the industry
representative bodies will be the members of HIAL.
The ABA has been involved in making submissions to
the HAL review. The transformation to the new model
will hopefully continue to deliver the valued results
that have led to the high productivity of the Australian
almond industry.
The collaboration with the Almond Board of California
continued to develop during 2013/14 and is highly
valued as we share knowledge and take joint action
where possible for the mutual benefit of our industry
stakeholders.
maintaining the high professional standard that the
ABA has become known for. Whether it is helping
growers with information, developing systems that
show governance transparency to auditors, dealing
with government or promoting almonds, our staff are
constantly looking to improve the communication
and support to all stakeholders.
On behalf of the Board and all industry stakeholders,
I would like to thank Ross, Ben, Brett, Shannon, Jo,
Debbie, Anna and Joseph for their efforts during
2013/14 in undertaking the varied activities of the ABA
as smoothly and effectively as they do to provide a
better operating environment for all our businesses.
Neale Bennett - Chairman
Four face to face meetings of the ABA Board of
Directors were held during 2013/14. These meetings
cover an agenda sequenced into Administration,
Finance, Reports, Production, Processing, and
Market Development. ABA Directors chair each of
the supply chain Committees that operate to facilitate
broad participation in whole of industry matters and
they bring the opinions and recommendations to the
Board for consideration. The contributions of the ABA
Directors and all involved in the ABA Committees are
appreciated.
The decisions made by the Board in regard to the
many issues considered fall to the ABA’s dedicated
and capable staff to progress. The ABA is extremely
lucky to have a group of enthusiastic and diligent
staff who spend a great deal of time and energy on
5
CEO’S REPORT
The Australian almond industry is in a buoyant
phase of its development. Grower returns are strong
with substantial gains over the past two years. The
industry marketers cleared the large 2013 crop and
are well underway to having sold the 2014 crop.
The recent pollination period has gone well and the
industry will produce a record tonnage should the
2015 crop fulfil its potential.
The growth on the domestic market has built on
an already strong average consumption figure for
Australians. The promotion and market development
programs have strong results to support their
value. The program of activity covers advertising,
public relations, working with health and fitness
professionals as important influencers and with the
food community to bring almond use to the fore in
recipes.
The prospects for marketing a large crop in 2015
appear very bright with the improved returns likely
to continue with the global supply limited by the
impacts of the drought being endured by Californian
producers, something we can all relate to and have
empathy towards.
The myriad of health benefit research findings
provides a stream of good news stories to promote
and has also earned almonds the highest five star
rating in the Governments new food ratings program.
The efforts by industry funded nutritionists to achieve
this result was a very worthwhile investment.
The Australian almond industry has recorded
impressive sales figures during 2013/14. Almonds
are now Australia’s most valuable horticultural export
product with sales more than double tablegrapes,
the next highest.
Domestic sales continued to increase in 2013/14
albeit at a slower rate than the extraordinary increase
of the previous year. The 3 percent increase in the
past year consolidated on the 20 percent gain made
in 2012/13 and the growth for the past five years that
has averaged more than 10 percent per annum.
6
The voluntary marketing levy paid by producers
and managed by the ABA through the Market
Development Committee is supplemented with
funding from Horticulture Australia Limited and the
Commonwealth Export Market Development Grant
program that assists the industry to build relations
with the trade in many of the 47 markets we export
to. The ABA’s trade fair program covered Western
and Eastern Europe, Asia and the Middle East during
2013/14. The Indonesian market was singled out for
market research and future investment in this market
appears warranted.
CEO’S REPORT
During the year, the ABA addressed the issue of
equity in the investment of the marketing funds
between the domestic and export markets. A phased
increase of investment towards export markets in
future will reflect the rising importance of overseas
markets in the balance of industry sales.
The ABA has provided input into the government
process to put free trade agreements in place with
Japan, Korea and China. These agreements will
remove the tariffs on Australian almonds entering
these markets that currently sit at 2 percent, 7 percent
and up to 24 percent respectively. The tariff removal
will assist the competitiveness of Australian almonds
in these markets that are currently ranked 33rd, 30th
and 10th in terms of export sales.
The continuing fall in the Australian dollar is also
benefitting the competitiveness of our product in
global markets and this is unlikely to change in the
short term.
The growth of the industry in terms of tonnage and
sales has brought with it growing expectations on
the ABA as an organisation. The level of interaction
with the industry members, governments, the media,
researchers, suppliers and other nut industry bodies,
both in Australia and around the world, has lifted
substantially.
The industry structure of the Board of Directors
with representation of producers and processor/
marketers and supporting supply chain Committees
covering Plant Improvement, Production, Processing,
and Market Development brings a lot of experience
and expertise to bear on current industry issues and
planning for the future. The ABA’s Audit Committee
continued to ensure the ongoing development of
sound corporate governance with financial systems
and reporting a particular focus.
putting together the commercialisation agreement
for new varieties, facilitating grower input into
orchard based trials and managing the availability of
chemicals.
The ABA also commissioned market and product
research, developed promotion programs, managed
industry attendance at international trade fairs and
domestic exhibitions and monitored their impact.
Communications is a key activity area for the ABA
with grower field days and discussion forums,
publications to assist producers and marketers, and
implementation of the OrchardNet® benchmarking
and grower management program. The ABA
Conference is also an important stakeholder forum.
In other words, the ABA has undertaken its stated
role of facilitating further growth of the industry,
maximising its profitability and ensuring its
sustainability by providing a platform for industry
members to collectively respond to industry wide
issues, invest in research and marketing, share
knowledge and interact with stakeholders.
By any measure 2013/14 has been a successful one
for the ABA in fulfilling this challenging role. The
efforts of the Board Directors, Committee members
and the ABA’s staff to taking the industry forward are
most appreciated.
Ross Skinner - CEO
During 2013/14, the Board addressed a wide gamut
of issues. The major ones, apart from the market
development matters already covered, being the
review of Horticulture Australia Ltd, the productivity
program of research projects developed for funding
to commence in 2014/15, the Almond Centre proposal
to increase scientific capacity and put in place
experimental orchard plantings, the establishment of
a body to represent all of horticulture with one voice,
and endeavours to facilitate improved tissue culturing
capability in Australia to produce hybrid rootstocks.
The ABA staff have been involved in undertaking
many varied activities during the year. These include
the provision of high health budwood to nurseries, the
development of nursery standards for almond trees,
7
ALMOND BOARD OF
AUSTRALIA
Initially established in 1995 as the Australian Almond Growers’ Association (AAGA), the association was re-structured and
renamed in 2002 as the Almond Board of Australia (ABA), reflecting a broader charter and membership base.
Aims & Objectives
•
•
•
•
To represent and promote the interests of Australian almond growers, processors and marketers in matters of general
interest that may affect the well being and viability of the Industry.
To coordinate the efforts of the Industry in order to give unity of purpose and strength to foster the development of
the Industry.
To provide a channel for communication and dissemination of information between members of the Industry and
other sectors of the horticultural industry.
To facilitate the development of a national industry development plan including the definition of national R&D
priorities and generic marketing funding and priorities.
Mission
As the Australian almond industry’s peak body, the ABA facilitates further growth of the industry, seeks to maximise its
profitability and ensure its sustainability by providing a platform for industry members to collectively respond to industry
wide issues, invest in research and marketing, share knowledge, and interact with government and other stakeholders.
Funding
ABA activities are funded through a combination of sources:
•
•
•
•
•
Membership fees and sponsorships
Sales of almond budwood
Voluntary contributions from Industry
Industry levies and contributions matched by the Federal Government via Horticulture Australia Ltd (HAL)
Additional grant funding sources
Members
ABA membership is voluntary, with a total of 237 members in 2013/14, comprising 88 Grower Members, 3 Marketer
Members and 146 Associate Members.
8
INDUSTRY STRUCTURE
AUSTRALIAN ALMOND INDUSTRY
Almond Board of
Australia (ABA)
Horticulture
Australia Limited (HAL)
HAL / ABA
Sub-Committees
Plant Improvement
Committee
Chair: Neale Bennett
Chair: Selwyn Snell
CEO: Ross Skinner
CEO: John Lloyd
Production
Committee
ABA Board
Industry Advisory
Committee
Processing
Committee
6 Grower Directors:
Adelaide, Riverland, Riverina, &
Sunraysia Regions
4 Marketing Directors
Office Of Horticultural
Market Access
Market Development
Committee
Dietitians
Association
of Australia
Growsmart
Training
Australian Nut
Industry Council
Sports Dietitians
Australia (SDA)
National Heart
Foundation
Partner Organisations
Pollination
Australia
National Irrigators’
Council
Nuts for Life
Produce
Marketing
Association
Plant Health
Australia
9
ABA BOARD
The ABA Board comprises four marketer representative positions and six grower
Domenic Cavallaro
representative positions: two representatives from both Riverland and Sunraysia regions
Adelaide Region
Grower Representative
and one representative from each of the Adelaide and Riverina regions. Directors are
elected by the Grower Members of the ABA for a two-year term.
The ABA Board meets on a quarterly basis to oversee management and performance of
the organisation. The Board represents the national interests of the industry, providing
strategic direction and overseeing the investments of the ABA.
Neale Bennett
Chair & Sunraysia Region Grower
Representative
Neale has been involved with almonds
since converting his family farm from
vines in 1992. Neale also operates a
contract almond harvesting business
Cowanna Harvesting.
His appointment as Deputy Chairman
and Sunraysia Region Grower
Representative on the ABA Board
follows positions as Secretary,
Treasurer and Chairman of the
Sunraysia region of the Australian
Almond Growers’ Association (AAGA).
Neale’s committee positions include
the
Audit,
Remuneration
and
Conference Committees. He is also
a member of the Almond Industry
Advisory Committee (IAC). 10
Damien Houlahan
Deputy Chair & Marketing
Representative
Damien is the Executive General
Manager
for
Olam
Orchards
Australia and has the responsibility
of overseeing almond operations
for Olam in Australia. This includes
managing their orchards, building of
the new almond processing facility
and the global marketing of Olam
almonds from the Australian orchards.
Damien is a member of the Olam
International Edible Nuts Management
Committee which includes the global
cashew and peanuts businesses.
He currently sits on the Market
Development Committee, Conference
Committee and Almond Industry
Advisory Committee (IAC).
For over three decades Domenic has
been involved in his family’s almond
production company at Munno Para
Downs, South Australia. He has been
involved in a number of industry
bodies including Chair of the Virginia
Horticulture Centre and Vice President
of the Virginia Irrigation Association. Domenic is a member of the Almond
Industry Advisory Committee (IAC)
and the Audit Committee. Domenic
has a diploma in Applied Science
(Agriculture) and a Post Graduate
Diploma in Horticultural Science.
Peter Cavallaro
Riverland Region Grower
Representative
Peter has been involved in the
almond industry since 1973, when
the family bought an almond orchard
in Angle Vale. He has been involved
in the cut flower industry where
growing and marketing were his main
responsibilities and he also was a
director of the Adelaide flower market.
In 1999 Peter developed an almond
orchard with the family at Angle
Vale and in 2002 seeing the scope
of the industry he became involved
in developing an almond orchard at
Walker Flat of which he is now General
Manager. Peter holds a Diploma in
Agriculture.
ABA BOARD
Denis Dinicola
Riverina Region
Grower Representative
Denis has been in irrigated agriculture
and rice growing in the Griffith area
for 26 years and of the past six years
commenced growing almonds at his
230 Ha property at Lake Wyangan near
Griffith NSW. Denis was appointed
to the ABA Board in 2009. Denis is
the Chair of the Almond Production
Committee and serves on the Almond
Industry Advisory Committee (IAC).
Brendan Sidhu
Riverland Region Grower
Representative
Brendan is Managing Director of
Jubilee Almonds, a large almond
orchard based in the Riverland, South
Australia. Brendan was appointed
to the ABA Board in 2007, and held
the position of Chairman from 2009 2012.
Brendan has been involved with
the Australian almond industry
since 1983. He has held positions
as both Secretary and Chair of the
Riverland region of the Australian
Almond Growers’ Association (AAGA).
Brendan also sits on the Almond
Industry Advisory Committee (IAC),
the
Remuneration
Committee,
Conference Committee and is Chair of
the Market Development Committee. Brendan holds an Advanced Diploma
in Horticulture and is a graduate of
the Australian Institute of Company
Directors.
Laurence Van Driel
Tim Orr
Marketing Representative
Sunraysia Region Grower
Representative
Laurence has been involved in the
trading and marketing of edible
nuts and dried fruits for over
25 years, providing him with a
sound understanding of shipping
requirements, foreign currency, trade
barriers and marketing strategies.
After receiving a Bachelor of Science
degree in Agriculture Business from
University of California at “Cal Poly”
San Louis Obispo, California, in 2006
Tim and his partners purchased
property at Lake Cullulleraine, Victoria
and has since planted 1,200 acres of
almonds. Currently Tim is a director of
Lake Cullulleraine Almonds.
In addition to being an ABA Board
representative, Tim serves on the
Audit Committee and the Plant
Improvement Committee.
Grant Birrell
He has also held senior purchasing
and sales management positions with
internationally recognised companies.
He became a member of the ABA
Board in 2011 and also serves on the
Market Development Committee and
Almond Industry Advisory Committee
(IAC).
Brenton Woolston
Marketing Representative
Marketing Representative
Grant joined the nut industry in 2006
as CEO of Nut Producers Australia
(NPA), managing the company’s
almond and pistachio businesses.
Prior to this, Grant spent 20 years in
the seafood industry which included
involvement in several seafood
industry bodies.
Brenton Woolston is General Manager
of Almondco Australia. Brenton was
appointed to Almondco as marketing
manager in 2001 and was promoted
to Group General Manager just over
a year later. Brenton has been a
member of the ABA Board since 2002
and held the position of Chairman in
2008 and 2009. Grant has been a member of the
Market Development Committee
since 2007 and became an ABA Board
member in 2008. He also served
as Chair of the Audit Committee and
was a member of the Almond Industry
Advisory Committee (IAC).
During 2012/13 he was a member of
the Market Development Committee,
Remuneration Committee and Chair
of the Processing Committee. Brenton
is also past President of the Australian
Nut Industry Council (ANIC).
11
ABA STAFF
Joseph Ebbage
Market Development Manager
Ross Skinner
Chief Executive Officer
Ross Skinner is Chief Executive Officer
of the Almond Board of Australia,
holding this position since November
2010. Ross has qualifications in
Economics and Accounting but
has worked in horticulture for 30
years, including Assistant General
Manager of the Australian Dried Fruits
Association and General Manager of
the Dried Fruits R&D Council and the
statutory export marketing body, the
Australian Dried Fruits Board. Ross
joined Horticulture Australia in 2002
and his role involved developing and
implementing strategic plans for the
Murray Valley horticultural industries.
Ben Brown
Industry Development Manager
Ben Brown was appointed as Almond
Industry Liaison Manager in May 2007.
Ben is responsible for working with
almond growers, ensuring industry
issues are identified and addressed
in the R&D strategic planning process.
He oversees a broad range of
communication activities to assist in
the transfer and uptake of research
outcomes. Ben also has management
responsibility for the almond industry’s
budwood site located in Monash,
South Australia.
12
Joseph Ebbage is engaged on a
contract basis to manage the Almond
Market Development Program. Based
in Melbourne, Joseph has been
working with the ABA since 2003. He
is the principal of “Consumer Insights”,
a market research and consultancy
agency. Joseph has developed
innovative solutions for companies
including Select Harvests, the Nuts
for Life Program and Horticulture
Australia Limited.
Shannon Harkins
Finance Manager
Shannon Harkins was appointed as
Finance Manager in 2011. Shannon is
responsible for managing the ABA’s
financial and legal responsibilities.
He also assists in updating almond
industry statistics including almond
planting, production and sales
information.
Shannon
provides
secretariat services to the ABA Board
and the Almond Industry Advisory
Committee (IAC).
Debbie McMahon
Administration Officer
Debbie McMahon was appointed
as Receptionist in June 2008 and
provides reception and administrative
support to the ABA. Debbie has
previously
worked
in
medical
administrative roles and as a primary
school teacher.
Jo Pippos
Communications Manager
Jo was appointed as Communications
Manager in July 2007, previously
holding the role of Administration/
Finance Manager with the ABA since
2006. Jo is responsible for preparing
a range of industry communications,
website updates and administrative
arrangements for the Australian
Almond Conference. Jo also served
as Secretary for the Australian Nut
Industry Council (ANIC) from 2007 to
2011.
Brett Rosenzweig
Industry Development Officer
Brett Rosenzweig was appointed as
a full-time Technical Officer in April
2007, following previous contract
employment with the ABA since
August 2006. In this role Brett
was responsible for day-to-day
management, data collection and
operations of the CT Optimisation
Trial, located at Clark Taylor Farms’
almond property in the Riverland. As
of July 2010, Brett’s role transitioned
into Industry Development Officer
(IDO) assisting industry uptake of
research findings.
SUB-COMMITTEES
Plant Improvement Committee
Chair
Committee
Tim Orr
Peter Cavallaro
Andrew Lacey
Tony Spiers
The Plant Improvement Committee oversees the Almond Breeding and Evaluation
Program and provides advice to the IAC with respect to future priorities for R&D
Daryl Winter
Co-opted Experts
investment and in the area of plant improvement.
Dr Justin Rigden
HAL ISM
Production Committee
Dr Michelle Wirthensohn
Chair
Committee
Stuart Burgess
Peter Cavallaro
Denis Dinicola
Graham Johns
John Kennedy
The Almond Production Committee oversees a wide range of production related
Paul Martin
research and development projects, also providing advice to the IAC with
Drew Martin
respect to future priorities for investment in production based research initiatives
Dr Ben Robinson
to increase yields and better manage risk factors.
Peter Ross
Tim Vandenberg
Robert Wheatley
HAL ISM
Processing Committee
Chair
Committee
Stuart Burgess
Brenton Woolston
Cameron Bell
Nigel Carey
Tony Costa
The Processing Committee’s role is to direct whole of industry efforts to add
Tom Martin
value in the processing of almonds by improving quality, more cost efficiently
Brenton Paige
meeting required quality specifications, and maintaining Australia’s high product
Toby Smith
integrity reputation.
Alison Smith
Bruce Van Twest
Mark Webber
Russell Wickstein
Davin Wright
Co-opted Expert
HAL ISM
Assoc Prof John Fielke
Stuart Burgess
13
SUB-COMMITTEES
Market Development Committee
Chair
Committee
Brendan Sidhu
The Almond Market Development Committee oversees the Almond Marketing
Grant Birrell
Program funded through a voluntary industry contribution. This committee also
Damien Houlahan
oversees marketing related research and development projects and provides input
Tim Jackson
Laurence Van Driel
with respect to market access issues to the Office of Horticulture Market Access
(OHMA).
Industry Advisory Committee
Chair
Committee
Dr Greg Buchanan
Neale Bennett
The Almond Industry Advisory Committee (IAC) is a committee of Horticulture
Nigel Carey
Australia Ltd (HAL) which oversees the Almond R&D program funded by the Almond
Domenic Cavallaro
R&D levy, together with voluntary contributions and matched funding from the
Denis Dinicola
Australian Government.
Graham Johns
Andrew Lacey
Paul Martin
Tim Millen
Brendan Sidhu
Toby Smith
Laurence Van Driel
Ex-Officio
Ross Skinner (CEO)
Stuart Burgess (HAL ISM)
14
Market Development
Report
Australian Almond Sales
Total export sales of Australian almonds for the 2013-14 crop
year were 48,910 tonnes which was 58 percent higher than the
previous year.
Total domestic sales were 20,802 tonnes comprised of 18,856
tonnes of Australian product and 1,946 tonnes of imported
product which is flat compared to last year. However, there was
a significant spike in imported product during the 2012-13 year.
In terms of domestic sales of Australian almonds, there was a 24
percent increase over the previous year.
From an export perspective, India remains the most important
single market for Australian almonds. However, from the table
below of market shares of Australian almonds, there appears to
be a significant opportunity in North-East Asia and South-East
Asia.
Australian Exports 2013/14
Europe
42%
India
27%
Middle East & Africa
17%
New Zealand
4%
Americas
4%
North-East Asia
3%
South-East Asia
3%
Total
100%
Australian Almond Export
Market Development
Program
The Australian Almond Export Market Development Program
had two major objectives during 2013-14: to continue to develop
our customer relationships and build our business in our major
markets of Europe, India and the Middle East; and to grow
new relationships in new markets such as Russia, Japan and
Indonesia.
It should be noted that while the Australian almond industry does
not have a significant presence in either Russia or Japan, both
have been important global almond markets. However, with the
unforeseen events in Eastern Europe of the past six months, the
Russian market is currently not available to either Californian or
Australian almonds.
Trade exhibitions
Australian almonds were promoted at five international trade
exhibitions during 2013-14. The first exhibition was at Anuga
in October 2013. Held in Cologne, Germany every two years,
Anuga is one of the world largest food fairs. Anuga2013 attracted
more than 155,000 visitors and 6,777 exhibitors. (Continued...)
Joseph Ebbage
Marketing Program Manager
15
MARKET DEVELOPMENT
Trade exhibitions serve as an efficient meeting place for the
Australian marketers to catch up with customers from numerous
countries, given that we sell into 14 different markets within
Europe. They also serve as an opportunity for traders who have
never purchased Australian almonds to meet with some of the
Australian marketers ‘face-to-face’. Over the last 10 years, the
response from visitors to our stand has changed from “I didn’t
know that Australia grew almonds” to “I’ve heard about Australian
almonds, but have never bought any”. Trade exhibitions allow
these almond buyers to meet with our Australian marketers and
form relationships that are more difficult via ‘cold-call’ email
enquiries.
The second Australian almond exhibition for the 2013-14
marketing year was at Prodexpo in Moscow. Held in early
February, our exhibition at Prodexpo had the objective of
developing relationships in a large almond market in which
Australian almonds were just being established.
The third exhibition was at Gulfoods in Dubai. This trade
exhibition is a permanent feature of our industry’s export market
development program. It attracts our key customers from India
and Africa as well as the Middle East. Gulfoods 2014 had over
4,200 exhibitors and more than 77,000 visitors. Although
the exhibition organisers have increased the space, almost
3,000 companies remained on the waiting list unable to be
accommodated.
The Chair of the ABA Marketing Committee, Brendan Sidhu, and
the ABA’s CEO, Ross Skinner, addressed an Australian Almond
Breakfast Seminar held on Day 2 of the Gulfoods. This event was
very well attended by over 60 of our customers – particularly
from India. This was the third time we have run a Seminar during
Gulfoods and continues to grow each year.
Our fourth exhibition was at Foodex in Toyko in March. It attracted
2,808 exhibitors from 78 countries and more than 73,000 buyers,
including food service companies, distributors and wholesalers.
The purpose of the Australian almond industry’s participation
in Foodex 2014 was to explore the market opportunity and
to understand the issues that relate to an Australian almond
expansion into the Japanese market.
Breaking into this market will take some time and consistent
marketing over the medium term. However Japan is an attractive
market as it has continued to grow during a time of rising
almond prices and has established consumer demand. The FTA
between Australian and Japan also removes the existing tariff
of 2.4 percent.
However, there are several impediments to the Australian
almond industry:
•
16
The country of origin statements on-pack would require
packaging alterations before Australian almonds could be
used; and
MARKET DEVELOPMENT
•
Some manufacturers currently specify
Californian almonds in their internal
specifications. These would also need
to be changed before they could buy
Australian almonds.
The last Australian almond export
marketing exhibition was at the INC International Nut Council – 2014 Congress.
This was held in Melbourne in May and
attracted many of our key customers from
around the world. Prior to the Congress,
there was a successful tour of our growing
regions. The Australian almond industry
participated through an exhibition booth
to provide the 860 delegates with an
update on our 2014-15 crop. It should be
noted that 750 of these delegates were
from outside Australia. There was also an
Australian almond networking event at the
MCG. Almond two dozen of our customers
participated in this event, principally
representing our Indian market.
One of the key drivers of growing almond
consumption globally is the versatility of
almonds. This is reflected in the continued
growth of products launched around the
world containing almonds.
Almonds were the leading tree nut for
global new product launches featuring in
8,369 products. Hazelnuts and walnuts
followed with 7,870 and 1,679 products
respectively.
Innova New Product Launches
Almonds
8,369
Hazelnuts
7,870
Walnuts
1,679
Pistachios
1,473
Cashews
1,441
Macadamias
675
Australian
Domestic
Marketing
Australian almonds
value proposition
Our domestic marketing program seeks
to address the major opportunities
highlighted
through
our
on-going
consumer research produced by the
quarterly Nielsen Homescan reports.
Nielsen’s Homescan Research into the
shopping behavior of 10,000 households
highlight some key trends that have
been reported consistently over the past
three years. Note, these households have
been selected to represent the sociodemographic spread of all Australian
households.
The first key finding is that while 86
percent of households buy some nuts
every year, only 46 percent buy some
almonds. This means that 40 percent of
Australian households buy some nuts
but no almonds. Developing ‘almond
solutions’ for this large segment of the
Australia population is a major opportunity
for the Australian almond industry.
The second key finding is that of the 46
percent of households who buy some
almonds every year, only 27 percent of
households buy two or more packs of
almonds annually. This ‘loyal’ almond
segment represents 89 percent of the
sales value as measured by Homescan.
Accordingly, 19 percent of all Australian
households that buy some almonds each
year represent 11 percent of sales value.
Increasing the purchase frequency of
this segment is another major marketing
opportunity.
The third key finding is to appropriately
understand the importance of the ‘higherfrequency’ almond segment. This segment
which is responsible to the large majority
of all almond consumption also represents
a major growth opportunity. This segment
will be most likely to increase their
consumption frequency.
Great taste, with a healthy
halo, personalised through
provenance
The ‘Australian Almond’ brand offers
significant value to Australian consumers:
There are three elements to this value
proposition: communicating the enjoyment
of the taste of almonds; educating
consumers and health professionals
as to the strong health credentials of
almonds and personalizing our almonds
by connecting our consumers with our
growers.
Advertising
During 2013-14, our marketing creative
featured some of our growers in our
advertising and social media. The
authenticity of this imagery is the
foundation of its appeal and cut-through.
Our advertising focused on health and
fitness conscious consumers who fit
into the category of almond purchasers
most likely to increase their consumption
frequency.
The important role of featuring ‘real almond
growers’ is that the imagery ‘interrupts’ the
reader of the fitness magazines or recipe
websites and engages them in our almond
messaging. This follows the First Principle
of advertising: to interrupt the audience.
If our advertising creative blended into
the same format as all the other material,
it wouldn’t be as noticeable. Over time,
our advertising will feature more almond
growers to ensure that we represent
our whole industry from our younger
17
MARKET DEVELOPMENT
members to our more senior ones. From
a marketing perspective, we know that
Australian consumers trust farmers and
growers which is why we are giving
growers a significant ‘voice’ within our
communications program.
A major on-going feature of our domestic
marketing plan relates to health and
nutrition. We promote the health benefits
of almonds by supporting Nuts for Life
which communicates the health benefits
of nuts in general and by our own industry
HAL funded ‘Almond Nutrition’ program.
cholesterol, assist in improving heart
health and help in the prevention of
diabetes. We also presented material
on almonds as a recovery snack
after sport and exercise. More than
200 doctors have requested our
educational packs of brochures and
snack tins.
•
The World Diabetes Congress was
held at the Melbourne Convention
and Exhibition Centre, Melbourne,
Australia from 2 to 6 December 2013.
The Australian almond industry coexhibited with Nuts for Life. Our focus
was to highlight the positive role of
almonds in preventing and managing
diabetes
•
The inaugural Adelaide Sport, Fitness
& Health Festival was held on the 7th
and 8th of December this year during
the Adelaide Ashes Test match.
The focus of the Australian almond
exhibition was the promotion of
almonds as a ‘natural sports recovery’
snack. We distributed our sports
nutrition brochures and our cricketthemed snack tins.
•
The Fitness Expo was held at the
Melbourne Exhibition Centre from
April 4-6. We distributed over 1000
fact sheets and 500 filled almond
Our Australian Almond health and nutrition
program included a broad range of
conference exhibitions:
•
The
New
Zealand
Dietitians
conference was the first New Zealand
health professional event in which
the Australian almond industry has
exhibited. It was attended by 200
dietitians, half of whom requested our
educational packs.
•
The Royal College of General
Practitioners conference was held
on October 17-19 at the Darwin
Convention Centre. We received a
positive reaction to our key health
messages: namely a handful of
almonds every day to reduce LDL
18
snack tins and received more than
200 requests for our Education packs
of snack tins and fact sheets. This is
extremely important as it involves
turning fitness trainers into ‘Almond
Advocates’.
•
The Exercise Science - Sports Dietitans
Conference in April and the Dieititians
Conference in May. We communicated
with over 1500 dietitians and exercise
physiologists and attracted more than
500 to join our database and receive
our education packs of snack tins and
brochures. Engaging with dietitians
and nutritionists remains a key part of
our program as they are major media
contributors in both mainstream and
social media.
Financial Reports
ALMOND BOARD OF AUSTRALIA ABN 31 709 079 099
For the year ended 30 June 2014, the Almond Board of Australia
reported net retained earnings of $289,227 based on revenue
of $3,429,104 and expenditure of $3,139,876.
Moscow, FoodEx - Tokyo, INC - Melbourne, Good Food and
Wine, General Practitioners’ Conferences, Fitness Expo’s etc.)
as well as targeted market research, advertising and promotion.
The key areas of revenue are Project and Grant Funding (43%)
and the Voluntary Marketing Levy (42%). There was an increase
in revenue of 9% for the financial year mainly attributable to the
voluntary marketing levy collected on the large 2013 crop.
Voluntary contributions co-fund projects including: Australian
almond industry liaison and extension; Australian almond
industry communications; Research and education of health
professionals relating to the health benefits of almond
consumption; Developing export markets for Australian almonds;
Almond Conference; and the Nuts For Life program.
Project and grant funding varies from year to year depending
on the schedule of payments and the number of projects
being undertaken. This funding resources key ABA activities
including the areas of industry development, market research
and development, and industry strategic planning and
implementation.
Project funding received late in the 2012/13 financial year
was expended in 2013/14 and led to a deficit budget for the
2013/14 financial year being approved. The actual result of a
$289,227 increase in retained earnings resulted from higher
than anticipated revenue from the voluntary marketing levy and
budwood sales whilst costs in the areas of advertising/media and
market research were lower than budgeted. The advertising and
promotional expenditure planned for the past was deliberately
restrained following the lower crop forecast for 2014. The aim
being to defer funding to support the 2014/15 program.
The expenditure for the financial year was in three main areas.
These being: Administration and organisational management
(35%); Marketing and market development activities (33%);
and Voluntary contributions to co-fund research projects with
Horticulture Australia Ltd (15%). There was an increase in
expenditure of 8% for the financial year.
During the year an independent financial audit of HAL funded
projects was conducted. The auditor reported favorably on the
ABA’s financial systems and corporate governance structures in
place for the management of all projects.
The ABA’s Audit Committee, Chaired by Grant Birrell, met four
times during the year and reviewed the quarterly financial
reports and all ABA expenditure for the period. The Committee
also directed the investment of ABA reserves in bank interest
bearing accounts as required and provided guidance on
financial management procedures and general matters.
The ABA operates within the guidelines set for reserve levels
on the General, R&D, and Marketing accounts where funds are
quarantined and managed separately. The expenditure from
the Marketing Account is directed by the Market Development
Committee and overseen by the ABA Board.
The uncertainty created by the changes to Horticulture Australia
Ltd. has made the budgeting process for 2014/15 a challenge with
a lack of progress in contracting projects for commencement in
2014/15.
Administration and organisational management costs
encompass a variety of areas including: staffing costs and Chair’s
allowance; general operational costs (rents, rates, electricity,
phones, insurances, postage, building security etc.); training and
development; travel costs; affiliation fees and sponsorships; and
meeting expenses.
The ABA remains in a sound financial position with no immediate
danger to the organisation’s solvency.
Marketing and market development activities include
participation by industry marketers at international and domestic
trade shows (Anuga - Cologne, Gulfoods - Dubai, ProdExpo -
Shannon Harkins Finance Manager
19
STATEMENT OF
OPERATIONS
Statement of Operations and Other Comprehensive Income
For the Year Ended 30 June 2014
Note
Revenue
Bud sales
Conference income
Grant funding
Interest received
Marketing contributions
Memberships and subscriptions
2014
2013
$
$
120,497
26,712
184,430
151,150
1,491,894
1,815,604
41,673
43,245
1,425,895
931,961
41,931
39,746
122,783
105,914
3,429,103
3,114,332
152,875
142,143
Annual conference expenses
145,412
145,005
Communications
447,169
164,685
Consultants
102,106
133,794
Cost of buds sold
33,242
37,274
Other Income
Expenses
Administration
Depreciation
21,487
21,654
Donations and sponsorships
77,608
61,823
Export Activities
371,269
291,920
Marketing program management
178,583
190,589
Meeting expenses
73,293
49,639
302,655
208,567
Pest and disease monitoring
-
5,455
Return unspent funds
-
23,993
667,479
637,916
Other expenses
Staff costs
Trade shows and events
97,625
98,119
469,072
672,997
3,139,875
2,885,573
289,228
228,759
Other Comprehensive income
--
-
Total Comprehensive Income
289,228
228,759
Voluntary Contributions
Surplus for the Year
20
FINANCIAL POSITION
Statement of Financial Position
As At 30 June 2014
Note
Current Assets
Cash & Cash Equivalents
2014
2013
$
$
2
1,784,225
1,581,712
Trade & Other Receivables
3
553,138
423,424
Prepayments
4
85,101
48,375
29,569
15,092
2,452,033
2,068,603
Inventories at Cost
Total Current Assets
Non Current Assets
Property, Plant & Equipment
5
167,524
170,379
Intangible Assets
6
36,575
36,575
204,099
206,954
2,656,132
2,275,557
Total Non Current Assets
Total Assets
Current Liabilities
Trade & Other Payables
7
405,857
350,682
Employee Benefits Liabilities
8
102,980
59,883
508,837
410,565
Total Current Liabilities
Non Current Liabilities
Employee Benefits Liabilities
23,076
30,001
Total Non Current Liabilities
23,076
30,001
Total Liabilities
531,913
440,566
2,124,219
1,834,991
Accumulated Surplus
2,124,219
1,834,991
Total Accumulated Members’ Funds
2,124,219
1,834,991
Net Assets
8
Accumlated Members’ Funds
21
CHANGES IN EQUITY
Statement of Changes in Equity
For Year Ended 30 June 2014
Balance at 1 July 2012
Accumulated
Surplus
Total
$
$
1,606,232
1,606,232
228,759
228,759
Balance at 1 July 2013
1,834,991
1,834,991
Surplus for the Year
289,228
289,228
2,124,219
2,124,219
Surplus for the Year
Balance as at 30 June 2014
CASH FLOWS
Statement of Cash Flows
For Year Ended 30 June 2014
Note
Cash Flows From Operating Activities
Receipts from Members
2014
2013
$
$
41,931
39,746
Other Receipts
3,239,832
3,399,874
Payments to Suppliers and Employees
(3,102,291)
(3,048,898)
41,673
43,245
221,145
433,967
Acquisition of Plant and Equipment
(18,632)
-
Net Cash From/(Used In) investing Activities
(18,632)
-
Net Increase in Cash Held
202,513
433,967
Cash at Beginning of Financial Year
1,581,712
1,147,745
1,784,225
1,581,712
Interest Received
Net Cash from Operating Activities
10
Cash Flow From Investing Activities
Cash at End of Financial Year
22
2
NOTES
Notes To The Financial Statements
For The Year Ended 30 June 2014
Note 1: Statement of Significant Accounting Policies
This financial report is a special purpose financial report prepared in order to satisfy the financial reporting requirements
of the Associations Incorporation Act (SA) 1985. The committee has determined that the association is not a reporting
entity for financial reporting purposes under Australian Accounting Standards. There are no users dependent on general
purpose financial statements and it is not a reporting entity.
This financial report except for cashflow information has been prepared on an accruals basis and is based on historic
costs and does not take into account changing money values or, except where specifically stated, current valuations of
non-current assets.
The following material accounting policies, which are consistent with the previous period, have been adopted in the
preparation of this financial report.
(a) Revenue
Non-reciprocal grant revenue is recognised in profit and loss when an entity obtains control of the grant and it is
probable that the economic benefits gained from the grant will flow to the entity and the amount of the grant can
be measured reliably. If conditions are attached to the grant which must be satisified before it is eligible to receive
the contribution, the recognition of the grant as revenue will be deferred until those conditions are satisfied.
When grant revenue is received whereby the entity incurs an obligation to deliver economic value directly back
to the contributor, this is considered a reciprocal transaction and the grant revenue is recognised in the statement
of financial position as a liability until the service has been delivered to the contributor, otherwise the grant is
recognised as income on receipt. Marketing contributions are recognised when the association has established
that it has a right to receive the revenue.
Revenue from the sale of goods and services to customers is recognised upon the delivery of the goods or services
to customers.
Interest revenue is recognised as it accrues using the effective interest rate method, which for floating rate financial
assets is the rate inherent in the instrument.
All revenue is stated net of the amount of goods and services tax (GST).
(b) Income Tax
The association is a non-profit organisation under the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997 and is not taxable nor is
it accounted for.
(c) Cash and Cash Equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand, deposits held at call with banks, and other short-term highly
liquid investments with original maturities of nine months or less.
(d) Property, Plant and Equipment
As from 1/7/05 plant and equipment purchased using project funds have been recorded as an expense rather than
included as an asset. The assets have been recorded this way to show a true value of unexpended grant funds.
All other property, plant and equipment are recorded at cost, less where applicable, accumulated depreciation
and any impairment losses. Depreciation is on a straight line or diminishing value basis over the useful lives of the
assets to the association commencing from
The depreciation rates used for each class of depreciable asset are:
Class of Asset Plant and Equipment Buildings
Depreciation Rate
6.66% - 40%
6.66% - 10%
The carrying amount of property, plant and equipment is reviewed annually by the committee to ensure it is not in
excess of the recoverable amount of those assets.
23
NOTES
Notes To The Financial Statements
For The Year Ended 30 June 2014
Note 1. Statement of Significant Accounting Policies (cont.)
(e) Goods and Services Tax (GST)
Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of GST, except where the amount of GST incurred is not
recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO). Receivables and payables are stated inclusive of the amount of GST
receivable or payable. The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the ATO is included with other receivables or
payables in the statement of financial position.
(f) Employee Benefits
Provision is made for the association’s liability for employee benefits arising from services rendered by employees
to the end of the reporting period. Employee benefits expected to be settled within one year together with benefits
arising from wages and salaries and annual leave which will be settled within one year, have been measured at
their nominal amount. Other employee benefits payable later than one year have been measured at the present
value of the estimated future cash outflows to be made for those benefits.
Contributions are made by the association to an employee superannuation fund and are charged as expenses
when incurred.
(g) Inventories
Inventories are measured at historical cost and valued thereafter at lower or cost and net realisable value.
(h) Trade and other receivables
Trade receivables are recognised initially at fair value and subsequently measured at amortised cost using the
effective interest method, less an allowance for impairment. Collectability of trade receivables is reviewed on an
on-going basis. Individual debts that are known to be uncollectible are written off when identified. An impairment
provision is raised when there is objective evidence that the Association will not be able to recover the receivable.
(I) Trade and other payables
Trade and other payables are carried at amortised cost and due to their short term nature they are not discounted.
They represent liabilities for goods and services provided to the Association prior to the end of the financial year
that are unpaid and arise when the Association becomes obliged to make future payments in respect of the
purchase of these goods and services.
( j) Leases
Leases of fixed assets where substantially all the risks and benefits incidental to the ownership of the asset, but not
the legal ownership, are transferred to the association are classified as finance leases.
Finance leases are capitalised by recording an asset and a liability at the lower of the amount equal to the fair value
of the leased property or the present value of the minimum lease payments, including any guaranteed residual
values. Lease payments are allocated between the reduction of the lease liability and the lease interest expense
for the period.
Leased assets are depreciated on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives where it is likely that the
association will obtain ownership of the asset or ownership over the term of the lease.
Lease payments for operating leases, where substantially all the risks and benefits remain with the lessor, are
charged as expenses on a straight-line basis over the lease term.
24
NOTES
Notes To The Financial Statements
For The Year Ended 30 June 2013
Note 1. Statement of Significant Accounting Policies (cont.)
(k) Intangibles Other than Goodwill
Water Rights
Water rights are recognised at cost of acquisition. Water rights have an infinite life and are carried at cost less any
impairment losses. Water rights are tested for impairment annually.
(I) Comparative Figures
When required by Accounting Standards, comparative figures have been adjusted to conform to changes in presentation for
the current financial year.
(m) Impairment of Assets
At the end of each reporting period, the entity reviews the carrying values of its tangible assets to determine
whether there is any indication that those assets have been impaired. If such an indication exists, the recoverable
amount of the asset, being the higher of the asset’s fair value less costs to sell and value in use, is compared to the
asset’s carrying value. Any excess of the asset’s carrying value over its recoverable amount is recognised in the
statement of operations and other comprehensive income.
Where the future economic benefits of the asset are not primarily dependent upon on the asset’s ability to generate
net cash inflows and when the entity would, if deprived of the asset, replace its remaining future economic benefits,
value in use is determined as the depreciation replacement cost of an asset.
Where it is not possible to estimate the recoverable amount of a class of asset, the entity estimates the recoverable
amount of the cash-generating unit to which the asset belongs.
Where an impairment loss on a revalued asset is identified, this is debited against the revaluation surplus in respect
of the same class of asset to the extent that the impairment loss does not exceed the amount in the revaluation
surplus for the same class of asset.
(n) Critical Accounting Estimates and Judgments
The committee members evaluate estimates and judgments incorporated into the financial report based on
historical knowledge and best available current information.
Estimates assume a reasonable expectation of future events and are based on current trends and economic data,
obtained both externally and within the association.
(o) New Accounting Standards for Application In Future Periods
The AASB has issued various Accounting Standards which are mandatorily applicable for future reporting periods.
The Association has decided not to early adopt these Accounting Standards. None of these Accounting Standards
are expected to have a significant impact on the financial statements of the Association.
25
NOTES
Notes To The Financial Statements
For The Year Ended 30 June 2014
Note 2: Cash and Cash Equivalents
Cash on Hand
2014
2013
$
$
585
980
115,678
45,867
1,178,368
1,247,005
439,708
226,901
-
5,972
59,605
58,136
(9,719)
(3,149)
1,784,225
1,581,712
515,265
98,134
37,873
325,290
553,138
423,424
85,101
48,375
85,101
48,375
Buildings - at Cost
125,225
125,225
Accumulated Depreciation
(48,708)
(43,237)
76,517
81,988
Plant and Equipment - at Cost
282,723
264,091
Accumulated Depreciation
(191,716)
(175,700)
91,007
88,391
167,524
170,379
At Cost
53,086
53,086
Accumulated Impairment Losses
(16,511)
(16,511)
36,575
36,575
Cash at Bank
Cheque Accounts
Express Saver Accounts
Term Deposits
Phil Watters Memorial Award Fund
Pollination Australia Funds
Credit Cards
Note 3: Trade and Other Receivables
Accounts Receivable
Sundry Debtors
Note 4: Prepayments
Prepayments
Note 5: Property, Plant and Equipment
Note 6: Intangible Assets Water Rights
26
NOTES
Notes To The Financial Statements
For The Year Ended 30 June 2014
2014
2013
$
$
Note 7: Trade and Other Payables
Unsecured
Trade Payables
176,209
156,296
11,779
12,298
GST Payable
63,513
47,283
Accounts Held in Trust
59,623
64,119
PAYG Withholding
Revenue Received in Advance
94,733
70,686
405,857
350,682
Accrued Annual Leave
60,167
52,090
Accrued Long Service Leave
42,813
7,793
102,980
59,883
23,076
30,001
- not lated than 1 year
5,023
5,518
- later than 1 year but not later than 5 years
7,903
12,926
12,926
18,444
Note 8: Employee Benefits Liabilities
Current
Non-Current
Accrued Long Service Leave
Note 9: Leasing Commitments
a) Operating Lease Commitments
Being rent for Konica Minolta Photocopier
Payable:
One photocopier agreement was for a period of 48 months starting from 1 October 2010 and ending on 30 September
2014 at fixed monthly rental of $387. A new lease agreement was entered in July 2013 for another 36 months ending on
31 July 2017 at fixed monthly rental of $351.
b) Operating Lease Commitments
Being for rent of Ford Territory TX Wagon
Payable:
- not lated than 1 year
-later than 1 year but not later than 5 years
0
7,823
-
-
0
7,823
Ford lease agreement was entered on 27 January 2011 and ending on 26 January 2014. The rent of $1,304 was fixed per
month.
27
NOTES
Notes To The Financial Statements
For The Year Ended 30 June 2014
2014
2013
$
$
c) Operating Lease Commitments
Being for rent of property
Payable:
- not later than 1 year
- later than 1 year but not later than 5 years
7,700
7,700
-
-
7,700
7,700
The property lease is a lease with a 1 year term from July 2014, with rent payable monthly in advance. Contingent
rental provisions within the lease agreement require that the minimum lease payments shall be increased by CPI
annually.
Note 10: Reconciliation of Net Cash Provided by Operating
Activities to Surplus for the Year
Surplus for the Year
289,228
228,759
Net Cash Flows in Surplus
Depreciation
21,487
21,654
Provision for Employee Entitlements
36,172
36,322
Changes in Assets and Liabilities
Change in Trade and Other Receivables
(129,714)
53,427
Change in Prepayments
(36,726)
66,044
55,175
20,057
Change in Inventories
(14,477)
7,704
Net Cash Inflow from Operating Activities
221,145
433,967
Change in Trade and Other Payables
Note 11: Contingent Liabilities
At 30 June 2014, the committee is unaware of any liability, contingent or otherwise, which has not already been
recorded elsewhere in this financial report.
Note 12: Capital Commitments
At 30 June 2014, the committee is unaware of any capital or leasing commitments, which have not already been
recorded elsewhere in this financial report.
Note 13: Events Subsequent to the Reporting Date
At the date of this report, the committee is unaware of any event subsequent to the reporting date that would
have a material impact on this financial report.
28
COMMITTEE STATEMENT
Almond Board of Australia Inc
Statement by Members of the Committee
The committee has determined that the Association is not a reporting entity and that this special purpose financial report
should be prepared in accordance with the accounting policies outlined in Note 1 to the financial statements.
In the opinion of the committee the financial statements comprising the statement operations and other comprehensive
income, the statement of financial position, the statement of changes in equity, the statement of cash flows and the notes
to the financial statements:
1.
Present fairly the financial position of Almond Board of Australia Incorporated as at 30 June 2014 and its performance
for the year ended on that date;
2. At the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that Almond Board of Australia Incorporated
will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due.
This statement is made in accordance with a resolution of the Committee and is signed for and on behalf of the Committee
by:
29
COMMITTEE STATEMENT
Almond Board of Australia Inc
Report by Members of the Committee
In accordance with Section 35(5) of the Associations Incorporation Act (SA) 1985, the committee of Almond Board of
Australia Incorporated hereby states that during the financial year to which the accounts relate:
1.
No officer of Almond Board of Australia Incorporated, or a firm of which the officer is a member,or a corporation in
which the officer has a substantial financial interest, has received or become entitled to receive a benefit as a result
of a contract between the officer, a firm of which the officer is a member or a corporation in which the officer has a
substantial financial interest and Almond Board of Australia Incorporated.
2. No officer of Almond Board of Australia Incorporated has received directly or indirectly from Almond Board of
Australia Incorporated any payment or other benefit of a pecuniary value, except for the following honorariums paid:
20142013
Chairman Allowance $25,000 $12,500
This statement is made in accordance with a resolution of the committee and is signed for and on behalf of the committee
by:
30
COMMITTEE STATEMENT
Independent Audit Report To The Members Of
Almond Board Of Australia Inc
Report on the Financial Report
We have audited the accompanying financial report, being a special purpose financial report of Almond Board of Australia
Incorporated (“the Association”) which comprises the statement of financial position as at 30 June 2014, the statement of
operations and other comprehensive income, the statement of changes in equity and statement of cash flows for the year
then ended, notes comprising a summary of significant policies and other explanatory information, and the statement by
members of the Committee.
Committee’s Responsibility for the Financial Report
The Committee of the Association is responsible for the preparation of the financial report, and has determined that the
basis of preparation described in Note 1 is appropriate to meet the requirements of the Associations Incorporation Act
1985 (SA) and the needs of the members. The Committee’s responsibilities also includes such internal control as the
Committee determines necessary to enable the preparation of a financial report that is free from material misstatement,
whether due to fraud or error.
Auditor’s Responsibility
Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the financial report based on our audit. We conducted our audit in
accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Those Auditing Standards require that we comply with relevant ethical
requirements relating to audit engagements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the
financial report is free from material misstatement.
An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial
report. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material
misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor
considers internal control relevant to the Association’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial report in order
to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion
on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting
policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the committee, as well as evaluating the overall
presentation of the financial report.
We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion.
Independence
In conducting our audit, we have complied with the independence requirements of Australian professional ethical
pronouncements.
31
AUDIT REPORT
Independent Audit Report To The Members Of
Almond Board Of Australia Inc
Opinion
In our opinion, the financial report of Almond Board of Australia Incorporated presents fairly, in all material respects,
the financial position as at 30 June 2014, and of its financial performance and its cash flows for the year then ended in
accordance with the accounting policies described in Note 1 to the financial statements, and the requirements of the
Associations Incorporation Act 1985 (SA).
Basis of Accounting and Restriction on Distribution
Without modifying our opinion, we draw attention to Note 1 to the financial report, which describes the basis of accounting.
The financial report has been prepared to assist Almond Board of Australia Incorporated to meet the requirements of the
Associations Incorporation Act 1985 (SA). As a result, the financial report may not be suitable for another purpose.
Nick Walker
27 August 2014
PartnerMildura
32
STATEMENT OF
OPERATIONS
Statement of Operations
For The Year Ended 30 June 2014
INCOME
Grant Funding
Annual Conference
2014
2013
$
$
1,491,894
1,815,604
98,664
70,086
Marketing Contributions
1,425,895
931,961
Voluntary Contributions
0
38,000
Memberships
Sponsorship & Advertising
Sales
Budwood Sales
41,931
39,746
89,780
83,000
3,987
9,236
120,497
26,712
Secretariat Fees
13,841
15,332
Recharges
94,421
41,255
Interest Earned
41,673
43,245
Sundry Income
6,519
154
3,429,104
3,114,332
Staff Costs
667,479
637,916
Chairman's Allowance
25,000
12,500
TOTAL INCOME
EXPENDITURE
Training & Development
1,445
4,195
Administration
181,700
186,238
Advertising/Media
413,385
125,549
Consultancy
102,106
133,794
Travel
53,443
52,100
Budwood & Evaluation
89,682
69,447
Site Operations & Management
4,039
7,053
Contractors/Agency Staff
17,072
5,116
Voluntary Contributions
469,073
672,997
Affiliation Fees
30,666
29,228
Donations / Sponsorships
77,608
61,823
Meetings Expense
73,293
49,639
Field Days/Workshops
30,687
16,227
Annual Conference
145,412
145,005
Market Access & QA
12,727
12,727
Market Research
7,440
13,267
Marketing Program Management
178,583
190,589
Export Activities
371,269
291,920
Trade Shows & Events
58,429
81,891
International Trips/Study Tours
127,934
54,881
0
5,126
Importations
Refunds/Returned Funds
Sundry/Other Expenses
TOTAL EXPENDITURE
OPERATING SURPLUS/(DEFICIT)
0
23,993
1,405
2,350
3,139,876
2,885,573
289,227
228,759
33
34
Almond
INDUSTRY ADVISORY COMMITTEE
ANNUAL REPORT 2013/14
Overview
Australian almond production is spread over
four key regions including Sunraysia (68
percent), the Riverland (18 percent), the
Riverina (11 percent), and Adelaide (three
percent). With production in 2013 of 73,000
tonnes, the Australian almond industry is the
second largest producer in the world behind
the US which produces 80 percent of global
supply of 1.2 million tonnes. On current
forecasts, commercial almond production
should rise to around 90,000 tonnes in 2016
from the 28,600 hectares of trees currently in
the ground. In 2013, over 60 percent of trees
were already fully mature and over 40 percent
still maturing.
This growth in tonnage is matched by
continued strong growth in export and
domestic market demand. The Indian and
Middle East markets continue to be the
main drivers of export growth for Australian
almonds. Exports of Australian almonds in
2013/14 were $468 million, becoming the
first horticultural product to sell more than
$300 million in a financial year.
VC funds were matched by the Australian
Government for all R&D activity.
HAL is responsible for managing these funds
and takes advice on how to invest the funds
from the almond Industry Advisory Committee
(IAC). Consultation with the IAC is essential
in determining the most critical investment
priorities for the industry. Priorities set by the
IAC include:
•
•
•
•
Crop production
Plant health: pathology, chemicals and
general
Industry analysis
Human nutrition.
In 2013/14, the Almond Board of Australia
(ABA) acted as the service provider on 11
projects.
The industry also contributes 2.25 percent of
levy and/or voluntary contributions (matched
to 4.5 percent) to the across industry program
and transformational investment program
that addresses issues that affect all of
horticulture, such as chemical access, plant
biosecurity, market access and robotics.
Levy investment
Strategic objectives
In 2013/14, the total income received
was $2,394,393 of which the Australian
Government provided $1,017,689 of matched
funding to support 28 projects in the research
and development (R&D) levy program.
The process for determining the industry’s
priorities began with the development of the
almond Strategic Investment Plan 2011-16
(SIP), which guides R&D investment over a
five-year period.
The rate of the domestic levy is one cent
per kilogram in-shell; two cents per kilogram
shelled; and 1.5 cents per kilogram nonpareil.
A total of $1,790,460 was invested into
research and development (R&D) projects.
The plan was developed to reflect the
industry’s priorities, the Australian
Government’s rural R&D priorities and is
reviewed regularly. The industry’s objectives,
as outlined in the strategic plan are:
In addition to levy funds, $414,062 of
voluntary contributions (VC) was provided to
the almond industry for supplementing levyfunded projects and solely funding VC-only.
•
•
•
•
Increase product value (quality and price)
Provide a supportive operating
environment (skills and communication).
All projects in the R&D program address one
or more of these objectives.
R&D program
The key issue facing almond production in
Australia is the unreliable weather at harvest.
Consequently the industry focus on new
production systems to mitigate this risk and
the heavy reliance on pollination services
given the threat posed by a Varroa mite
incursion are at the forefront of investment.
More specifically, investigation of high
density orchard systems and their potential
implications on transition to such models is a
high priority area for investment in the short to
medium term.
The R&D program consisted of 20 projects.
Of this, 17 projects were funded solely by
Voluntary Contributions (VC), and three
projects were both levy and VC funded.
This report
This report provides a snapshot of project
activities in the 2013/14 year. The report’s
sections are divided by the industry’s
objectives to reflect the R&D and marketing
activities being undertaken that address
these industry issues.
For more information contact:
Stuart Burgess, HAL Industry Services Manager
T 0417 536 300
E stuart.burgess@horticulture.com.au
Develop and maintain market
opportunities (volume sold)
Improved efficiency and sustainability
(costs and risks)
1
OBJECTIVE 1
Develop and maintain market opportunities
Developing export markets for Australian almonds
The Australian almond industry crop in 2013
jumped 23,000 tonnes to 73,300 tonnes. This
leap in available supply was for the most part
sold into 47 overseas markets and resulted in
almonds being the first Australian horticultural
crop to have annual export sales in excess of
$300 million. The development of close trade
ties with India have resulted in this market
alone taking almonds worth $100 million and
similarly with the UAE taking $43 million.
The attendance at trade fairs in Asia, Middle
East, Western Europe, and Eastern Europe
identified trade contacts critical to further
develop markets in these regions to clear
the significant jump in crop from maturing
orchards.
Market research in promising Asian export
Almond international networking
The Almond Board of Australia (ABA) has
developed a beneficial relationship with
the Almond Board of California (ABC) and
researchers in the US, Spain and New
Zealand through this networking project.
In 2013/14, ABA representatives attended
the US Almond Conference held in
Sacramento in December and not only
heard presentations on their extensive
research program but also met with staff of
the Almond Board of California to discuss
market development, food safety issues,
nutritional studies, sustainability programs,
and communications and extension within
their industry. Experiencing how they
conducted the conferences also provided
valuable lessons for the ABA.
In addition to the US conference, the ABA
linked with the ABC to discuss export
market access issues and statistical
collection activities during a meeting held
in Delhi, India in February and again in
Melbourne in May.
From these regular inter Board meetings a
strong relationship has developed with the
open sharing of knowledge benefiting both
industries. It has been agreed that during
2014, representatives of both organisations
will present at each other’s Conference.
2
The International Nut Conference held
in Melbourne provided an opportunity
to engage with the wider nut industry
and a meeting of 42 nut and dried fruit
bodies from around the world was held to
progress the development of a forum for
representative bodies to exchange views
and knowledge on matters of mutual
interest.
The participation by Dr Greg Buchanan, the
Almond Industry Advisory Committee (IAC)
Chair, and Phil Haines of the Department of
Environment and Primary Industries (DEPI)
Victoria and the delegation that visited
India to investigate co-operative research
arrangements was funded from this project.
Project AL12701
For more information contact:
Ross Skinner, Almond Board of Australia
T 08 8582 2055
E rskinner@australianalmonds.com.au
markets has identified opportunities to take
further advantage of our proximity to the
dynamic growing markets in this region.
Project AL12016
For more information contact:
Ross Skinner, Almond Board of Australia
T 08 8582 2055
E rskinner@australianalmonds.com.au
15th Annual Australian Almond Industry Conference
The 15th Annual Australian Almond
Conference was held in October 2013
in Glenelg, South Australia and included
presentations by respected researchers and
experts covering the entire supply chain
from both a domestic and an international
perspective. Speakers addressed issues
of industry interest; from pollination to
promotion and product quality to global price
prediction.
With a record of 320 delegates enjoying the
conference, it was considered a success
showcasing the Australian almond industry
well to industry participants and the broader
community.
The significant jump in delegates attending
justified the move of conference to a capital
city venue for the first time to provide more
space, easier airport access, and sufficient
on-site accommodation.
The theme for the 2013 event, “Today’s
Challenges – Tomorrow’s Success”, focused
on being forward-looking to develop
production systems that address the current
risks being faced and look to investigate with
a view to adopting new orchard designs and
management systems that suit our climate,
soils, labour costs and transport distances.
Keynote speakers at the event included John
Slaughter, Director of Breeding Program
at Burchell Nursery in California; Bruce
Lampinen, Integrated Orchard Management
(walnut and almond specialist) from the
University of California Department of
Plant Sciences; Gerald Martin, Chairman of
Pollination Industry Research & Development
Advisory Committee and Roger Duncan,
Pomology & Viticulture Advisor from
the University of California Cooperative
Extension.
Growers and delegates went away with a
thorough understanding of the industry’s
research activities and an insight into the
wide-ranging efforts to further develop
our industry – from production through to
processing and onto the marketing of our
largest ever almond crop.
Project AL12702
For more information contact:
Ross Skinner, Almond Board of Australia
T 08 8582 2055
E rskinner@australianalmonds.com.au
Left: Roger Duncan (top) and Gerald Martin (bottom) presenting at the 2013 Australian Almond Conference. Right: Conference attendees.
3
OBJECTIVE 2
Increase product value
Advanced
processing of
almonds
This project addresses several postharvest
processing priorities of the Australian
almond industry with research undertaken
to:
•
•
•
Evaluate the improved cracking of
almonds using new processes and
equipment on a range of varieties with
the aim of increasing the recovery of
undamaged kernels. This would reduce
losses, improve the appearance of
shelled almonds and permit better
machine vision sorting of defects.
Quantify the parameters affecting
dehydration of almond fruit and its
components. These parameters
will be used to formulate improved
management strategies and equipment
to manage higher moisture content fruit
and thus allow earlier harvest whilst
improving product quality.
Evaluate equipment and processes to
hull almonds on-farm. As hulls make
up 50 percent of the almond mass and
contain many nutrients, hulling on the
farm will reduce nutrient costs if they
are returned to the orchard and reduce
storage and transportation costs.
Project AL12003
For more information contact:
A/Prof John Fielke, University of South Australia
T 08 8302 3119
E john.fielke@unisa.edu.au
4
Almond food
safety
Ensuring compliance to food safety
requirements is an integral part of food
production and marketing. The aim of
this project is to develop pre-emptive
measures to mitigate food safety risks,
to safeguard access to markets and to
ensure consumer safety.
Investigations conducted by the
project team continued to improve the
understanding of the development of
Aspergillus spp. in almond orchards
and stockpiles, influence postharvest
conditions and management practices
on microbial growth, and the influence of
moisture on the growth of Aspergillus and
aflatoxin production. The research team
has also gained further understanding on
the inter-relationships of other important
almond disease and pest: hull rot and
carob moth.
This project has identified critical control
points for mitigating microbial growth in
almond stockpiles. Strategies can now target
the surface layers of almond stockpiles to
reduce moisture build up during long-term,
outdoor storage. Evidence has been provided
to the industry on a better performing
tarp for covering almond stockpiles, which
reduces microbial growth and crop loss.
The evidence has resulted in the tarp being
utilised by growers. Recommendations have
been provided to the industry on stockpile
preparation and management to reduce
microbial growth during storage.
Further evaluation of better tarp materials
will be undertaken, as part of the continuous
improvement process in developing practical
solutions, to ensure stockpiles are sheltered
from the rain, and without trapping moisture
or high relative humidity during field storage.
Project AL11009
For more information contact:
Dr Chin Gouk, Department of Primary Industries,
Vic
T 03 9032 7306
E chin.gouk@depi.vic.gov.au
Managing carob moth in almonds
Carob moth is a global pest of numerous
tree crops and over the past four seasons
has become the most significant insect
pest in Australian almond orchards. In
response to the threat posed by this pest,
two insecticides have been made available
to the almond industry via emergency and
minor user permits, and large-scale spray
applications have been used by some
producers in an attempt to protect crops
from damage. The moth, however, breeds
within mummified nuts on trees and lays
eggs inside the crack of newly split almond
hulls, making it difficult to target with
insecticides. Replicated field trials have
failed to achieve significant reductions in
kernel damage in new crops with spray
treatments.
Data on the seasonal abundance and
phenology of carob moth have been
collected to provide valuable insights into
the pest’s distribution, behaviour and
potential management options. As is the
case for the related Navel Orange Worm in
California, very low mummy nut populations
(possibly two per tree) are likely to be
required if mummy management is the sole
strategy used to tackle carob moth.
A pheromone-based mating disruption
(MD) product used to manage carob moth
in Californian dates is being assessed
by this project for efficacy in Australian
almonds. The MD treatment has provided
good suppression of trap catches, but more
detailed moth behavioural studies (planned
for spring 2014) are needed to achieve
the required reduction in kernel damage in
subsequent field trials.
The 2014/15 season is the project’s third
and final year. This will be a critical one for
clarifying the effective use pattern for MD in
almonds and demonstrating the potential
benefits from this approach which include
increasing crop value and profitability as well
as minimising environmental impact through a
reduced need for pesticide applications.
Project AL12004
For more information contact:
David Madge, Department of Primary Industries, Vic
T 0427 233 692
E david.madge@depi.vic.gov.au
Top: Counting mummies left on trees. Bottom: Carob moth lure and moths on tricky trap base.
Understanding consumer purchasing behaviour
Reliable information on consumer purchase
patterns helps the almond industry to gain a
better understanding of shopping behaviour
and empowers better demand and promotion
planning throughout the year.
Nielsen’s Homescan Consumer Panel has
been designed to monitor and understand
household purchasing of packaged
grocery and fresh produce. With 10,000
demographically representative households,
their Australian panel is now the secondlargest panel per capita in the world, providing
household level data on a continuous basis.
In 2013/14, 47 percent of Australian
households purchased almonds at least
once. The average Australian household
spent about $21 on almonds across three
occasions in the year. Of the households that
bought almonds, households that do not have
children under 18 years are important to the
industry as they account for 72 percent of the
total expenditure. ‘Established Couples’ and
‘Senior Couples’ are also important, together
they account for close to 50 percent of total
almond sales.
Despite representing a lower proportion of
total almond sales, families with children
(under 18 years old) spent $19 per household
on almonds across the year. Opportunity
lies in ‘Start-up Families’, with $15 spent on
almonds across two occasions (the lowest
amongst all demographic groups), contributing
only five percent to the total sales.
Project MT12010
For more information contact:
David Chenu, HAL
T 02 8295 2381
E david.chenu@horticulture.com.au
5
OBJECTIVE 3
Improved efficiency and sustainability
Enhancing almond pollination efficiency
This project focused on the influence of
pollination strategy on bee activity and the
flower to fruit conversion ratio, which is
substantially determined by pollination. In
particular, the researchers examined whether
adjustment to the pollination strategy might
help to support higher yields.
It has been suggested that pollen traps and
enpollination felt fitted at hive openings could
raise pollination effectiveness of bees but
beekeepers are concerned that there would
be negative impacts on bee hive health. The
researchers found that pollen traps had a
strong negative effect on brood production
and a more variable effect on number of bees
that was negative across most hives but, in
contrast, the effects of enpollination felt on
brood and bees were so small that they were
not significantly different from the controls.
Enpollination felt did not increase fruit set
compared to normal practice.
The first flowering season was focused on
observations of bee activity in transects
extending from hives out to one to two
hundred meters distant. There was no
correlation between the observed bees-perflower-per-minute and fruit set. Seven years
of variation in almond yield was examined
and related to records of the weather during
flowering but ‘bee weather’ was not a strong
predictor of yield.
6
The researchers next focused on recording the
rate at which pollen is removed from anthers,
comparing flowers on trees 400 metres or
more from hives compared to those near
hives. These data showed unambiguously
that pollen removal is significantly lower on
trees far from hives. Standard practice in
many large orchards means that parts of the
orchard are approximately 400 metres from
hive placements.
The researchers then examined if reduced
bee activity far from placements corresponded
with reduced fruit set. A decline in fruit per
flower was found at increasing distance from
the hive: from 36 percent fruit set near hives
declining to 28 percent at 850 meters.
Standard practice in many large orchards,
such as those used to assess pollen removal
rate and the distance from hives effect on
fruit set, is 6.7 hives per hectare (hph),
approximately 120 hives hundreds of meters
apart. The researchers examined lower hph
and smaller numbers of hives per placement.
A positive relationship was found between
conversion of flowers to fruit and hive density
(hph): an average of 33 percent fruit set at
2.8 hph increasing to 46 percent at 6.7
hph. The best fruit per flower outcomes were
gained with a high hive density (approximately
6.7 hph) but using smaller placements with
shorter distances between them.
Hand pollinations conducted on trees
confirmed that hand application of pollen from
a compatible variety raises average fruit set
up to 55 percent, which is above that typically
seen in open pollination. However, fruit set
from hand pollination was more variable than
fruit set from open pollination.
The experiments used assessments of
fruit set in October, but harvest typically
commences in February. For 275 trees that
flowered in 2013, the researchers counted
fruit set in October and February. This analysis
found that only six percent of fruit were lost
between surveys, so that fruit count in October
is a very strong determinant of the pattern
of fruit set at harvest. The researchers also
examined the influence of branchlet diameter
and flower density on fruit set and determined
that these architectural and resource
constraints on fruiting have some influence,
which need to be understood.
Project AL11003
For more information contact:
Dr Saul Cunningham, CSIRO Sustainable
Agriculture Flagship
T 02 6246 4356
E saul.cunningham@csiro.au
Impact of strategic deficit irrigation for almonds on
tree phenology, bloom, nut set and hull rot
An experimental site was established in June
2009 at Lake Powell near Robinvale, Victoria.
Five levels of irrigation were tested: a 100
percent watered control; three levels of deficit
irrigation (55, 70 and 85 percent) applied as
regulated (RDI) or sustained (SDI) deficits;
and a high irrigation level (120 percent).
Full irrigation (100 percent) was defined as
the level of irrigation that meets plant water
requirements. It was estimated according
to the standard protocol developed by the
Almond Board of Australia. The five-year
average estimate of the water requirement
of control trees was 12.4 Ml/ha, ranging
between 11 to 14 Ml/ha.
The almond industry has recognised that
its future success will increasingly depend
on strategies that ensure the most effective
and efficient use of irrigation water and
therefore has, in collaboration with the
Department of Environment and Primary
Industries, Victoria, initiated a research
project to:
•
•
Determine minimum levels of irrigation
to maintain productivity and crop
survival.
Develop irrigation strategies with the
potential to make industries more
resilient in the face of increasingly
variable water supply.
The impact of the different irrigation
strategies on agronomic performance and
tree physiology were investigated and key
agronomic and physiological variables were
monitored throughout the growth period.
The key outcomes of the project were:
•
•
Irrigating at 85 percent or more of
normal practice had no negative impact
on kernel size and yield but irrigating at
70 percent or less decreased kernel yield
regardless of strategy
Irrigating at 85 percent or more of
normal practice, which represents a
moderate deficit compared to fully
irrigated trees (100 percent), has good
potential to alleviate water shortages
•
•
•
•
without loss of production
Trees with deficits applied throughout
the irrigation cycle adapted more
readily to reduced water than those
receiving deficits where the stress was
biased toward pre-harvest
Deficit irrigation had a stimulating
effect on fruit set and there was a
positive correlation between set and
the level of deficit. However, the higher
set possibly was compensation for a
lower flower number in water deficient
relative to control trees
Water deficits had no impact on the
timing of flowering or fruit set but
tended to accelerated hull split in line
with the level of deficit
Annual increase in stem circumference
was the most accurate indicator of the
cumulative effect of irrigation deficit on
tree growth.
Project AL12010
For more information contact:
Dave Monks, Department of Primary Industries,
Vic
T 03 5051 4393
E dave.monks@depi.vic.gov.au
Understanding pollination practices
TQA Australia recently undertook a survey
of primary producers in the apple, pear,
blueberry and cherry industries to gain a
better understanding of current pollination
practices and the decision-making that
underpins it. The purpose of this survey is to
enhance the decision-making capability of
stakeholders to better equip them to prepare
for and manage a response to the impacts of
Varroa mite becoming established in Australia.
The online survey was widely promoted by
industry bodies through traditional and social
media and over 100 responses were received.
The survey was supplemented with over 20
face-to-face interviews in four key regions.
These in-depth interviews allowed for deeper
exploration of issues identified in the survey.
Preliminary results indicate that there is
a high degree of awareness of effective
pollination practices within these industries,
and that growers remain very interested in
further improving their understanding and
skills in this area.
Project MT13027
For more information contact:
Mark Leech, TQA Australia
T 0487 386 833
E mleech@iinet.net.au
7
Monash remediation
Almonds are susceptible to a variety of
endemic and exotic bacteria, phytoplasmas,
viruses, viroids and fungi which if introduced
to an orchard at an early age are likely to
reduce orchard health and ultimately limit
production.
The almond industry has been a strong
advocate of high health material that dates
back to the 1970s which eventually led to
the development of the industry’s budwood
repository at Monash, South Australia. The
site consists of 64 cultivars/clones and has
undergone strict management strategies
appropriate for budwood repository blocks,
but following the consideration of several
factors it was decided to reinitiate the site
with newly tested material.
This project is progressing well using
Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technology
and biological indexing to gain a detailed
understanding of the virus status of all
cultivars. After the completion of this testing
new high-health pathogen-tested material
will be produced and ensure the Australian
almond industry has enhanced orchard
biosecurity, and efficient and productive
almond orchards.
Project AL12011
For more information contact:
Ben Brown, Almond Board of Australia
T 08 8582 2055
E bbrown@australianalmonds.com.au
Australian almond variety evaluation and
commercialisation program
The aim is to develop and release new
almond cultivars by following directly on
from stage two of the Australian almond
breeding program (project AL08000), with
more emphasis on secondary evaluation
in commercial trials and PBR registration,
while continuing primary evaluation. This
breeding project aims to improve the
productivity and economic gain for the
Australian almond industry by producing
new cultivars with higher kernel yield and
quality, self-fertility and disease tolerance.
The Australian Almond breeding program
has produced several promising selections
to date, which are being evaluated in
secondary and tertiary trials at various
locations in almond growing regions. The
tertiary evaluation phase involves semicommercial trials of approximately 100
trees of each selection grafted to rootstocks
and planted on three different commercial
orchards in at least two different growing
regions. These were planted in 2013.
The first five selections derived from the
program continue to be evaluated in the
8
field for flowering time, yield, crackout and
kernel quality. We now have six years of yield
data to draw upon to confirm their superior
yield to Nonpareil and kernel quality based
on taste and oil analysis. 2014 was the
second year of harvest for the second of
the secondary trials and some are showing
promise with yields greater than Nonpareil.
Further selections are currently being
evaluated from the primary evaluation site at
Dareton.
The current project will run until June 2018.
It is expected that the almond industry will be
provided with:
•
•
•
•
Performance evaluation of local and
imported selections
Increased production estimated at
15 percent and decline in reliance on
existing cultivars over a period of ten
years
Increased range of cultivars to five or
more to target established markets by
2018
Selection of new improved scion cultivars
with self-fertility, larger kernels, and
•
•
improved flavour and nutrition
Improved pollinators for Nonpareil
Virus detection in breeding stocks,
selections and any required virus
elimination. Project AL12015
For more information contact:
Dr Michelle Wirthensohn, The University of
Adelaide
T 08 8313 6653
E michelle.wirthensohn@adelaide.edu.au
Evaluation of potential Prunus rootstocks for almond
production
The Australian almond industry has
predominantly used Nemaguard rootstock
as the industry standard, but with
agronomic challenges in many of the
traditional Australian almond growing
regions there is a clear need for new
rootstocks.
The almond industry has obtained access to
15 rootstocks, either through its own supply
or through negotiations with Australian
agents of international rootstocks under
Plant Breeders Rights (PBR).
The rootstocks were grafted to Nonpareil (50
percent), Carmel (25 percent) and Peerless
(25 percent) and the trees were planted in
August 2013 in a replicated, randomised
design to enable statistical analysis and an
independent evaluation. Nemaguard rootstock
will act as the control.
The evaluation site exhibits some challenging
characteristics, including replant conditions
and nematode pressure.
Evaluation sites will be managed with
adequate water and fertiliser management;
either pertaining to the growing region, or at
lower than optimum conditions.
Project AL11012
For more information contact:
Ben Brown, Almond Board of Australia
T 08 8582 2055
E bbrown@australianalmonds.com.au
Tools to detect endemic and exotic pathogens of
Prunus species
This project aims to improve the biosecurity
of the almond and summerfruit industries
through improved pathogen-testing of
newly imported varieties during post entry
quarantine and of local varieties held
by certification schemes, nurseries and
growers.
The list of quarantine and endemic
pathogens significant to the Australian
summerfruit and almond industries was
reviewed and updated. New or improved
molecular tools have been developed for
the rapid and sensitive detection of many
of these pathogens, including a detection
method for pollen-borne viruses. These
tests are being validated in the field.
Molecular methods, including next
generation sequencing (NGS), are being
developed to analyse the genetic diversity
of Ilarviruses, such as Prunus necrotic
ringspot virus, which have a significant
economic impact on production. Preliminary
results indicate significant genetic diversity
of Australian Ilarviruses exists, which may
affect their reliable detection.
Project MT12005
For more information contact:
Dr Fiona Constable, Department of Primary
Industries, Vic
T 03 9023 7326
E fiona.constable@depi.vic.gov.au
9
Submission to authorities in Japan and Taiwan
addressing provisional MRLs
Japan and Taiwan are requiring the
submission of data packages to either
maintain or establish domestic Maximum
Residue Limits (MRLs) that act as import
tolerances. The Ministry of Health, Labour
and Welfare (MHLW) in Japan is currently
assessing provisional MRLs and requires
supporting data, else they would be
withdrawn. To minimise potential trade
disruption support for Australian based
provisional MRLs was needed.
Input was sought from potentially affected
horticultural industries on priority chemicals
and MRLs requiring support in Japan and
Taiwan.
For priority chemicals, data packages are
being prepared by the Australian Pesticides
and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA)
for submission to MHLW by the Department of
Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF).
The first submission to Japan was made
in March for the following chemicals:
10
2,2-DPA, albendazole, aliphatic alcohol
ethoxylates, altrenogest, azamethiphos,
bacitracin, butroxydim, carbaryl, carbonyl
sulphide, carfentrazone-ethyl, clofentezine,
cypermethrin, diphenylamine, Diuron,
dodine, ethylene dichloride, fenvalerate,
fluazifop, fluazuron, flumethrin, flupropanate,
furathiocarb, halofuginone, kitasamycin,
maduramicin, MCPB, moxidectin,
naphthalophos, norgestomet, novobiocin,
omethoate, permethrin, piperonyl butoxide,
pirimiphos-methyl, pyraclofos, salinomycin,
terbutryn, thiometon, Triadimenol.
Each APVMA submission to Japan includes
the following information:
•
A list of Australian MRLs for currently
approved uses
•
Copies of Australian product labels
detailing approved uses
•
Copies of toxicology evaluations
•
Copies of residues evaluations that
provide justification for Australian MRLs.
The project is ongoing. The next data
submission included the following 24
chemicals:
2-phenylphenol, bupirimate, clodinafop
acid, daminozide, DDT, fenprostalene,
hexachlorobenzene, imazapyr,
methabenzthiazuron, metosulam,
napropamide, oxabetrinil, oxacillin, oxadixyl,
phenothrin, propaquizafop, robenidine,
sulfatroxazole, tebuthiuron, temephos,
terbutylazine, thifensulfuron, tri-allate,
triflumuron.
The final data submission for the final 72
chemicals was planned for mid-2014.
Project MT12045
For more information contact:
Kevin Bodnaruk, AKC Consulting Pty Ltd
T 02 9499 3833
E akc_con@zip.com.au
Preparing for an incursion of Varroa mite
Many horticultural industries rely on
the pollination services of honey bees.
An incursion of Varroa would result
in significant reductions in wild bee
populations along with quarantine
restrictions of managed hives, threatening
this supply.
This project aims to investigate the impact
of a Varroa incursion on hive movements,
contingency planning, and pollination
alternatives that could be used by our
horticulture industries to help manage a
reduction in hive availability. The project
also aims to strengthen the partnership
between pollination-dependent industries
and bee keepers and highlight the
implications of emergency response
operations.
Pollination dependent industries have
already been involved in an online
questionnaire to gain an insight into
industries reliance on bee pollination, what
planning and preparedness is in place for
the presence of Varroa and to understand
the annual movement of tens of thousands
of managed hives throughout Australia.
From these results an initial report has
been produced, Varroa Mite Preparedness
of Pollination Dependant Industries’
As part of the project, a simulation workshop
focusing on the potential impacts of a
Varroa mite incursion on pollination, using
the almond industry as the example, tested
the key findings of the review and increase
understanding of the required roles,
responsibilities and obligations of industries
and governments under the Emergency Plant
Pest Response Deed.
A final report will outline the
recommendations from the industry review
and outcomes of the simulation exercise to
help pollination providers and pollinationreliant industries prepare for and effectively
respond to an incursion of Varroa mite.
The project is being managed by Plant Health
Australia and funded by the Pollination
Program, a partnership with the Rural
Industries Research and Development
Corporation (RIRDC), Horticulture Australia
Limited (HAL) and the Department of
Agriculture.
Project MT12049
For more information contact:
Brad Siebert, Plant Health Australia
T 0417 653 128
E hal@phau.com.au
Varroa mite on bee pupae.
Molecular mapping, nutrition, and value adding of
almonds
A three-part project, of which two parts
constitute PhD projects at the University
of Adelaide: one on molecular mapping of
important almond traits; and the other on
almond polyphenols and fatty acids. The third
part is a smaller Postdoctoral two-year project
on value-adding of almond waste. The PhD
projects will directly contribute to the Australian
Almond Breeding Program (project AL12015)
and the value-adding project will address
supporting sustainable almond production –
one of the priorities of the Australian almond
industry.
On completion of the project, the outcomes
expected are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
facilitate the breeding program
Access to a wider range of markers
developed in other laboratories
Identification of new scion cultivars with
improved nutritional value
Information on the Free Fatty Acid
profiles, Polyphenols and Vitamin E
content in almond cultivars, selections
and breeding stock
Comparison of the effectiveness of
several almond extracts on colon cancer/
skin cancer cells and healthy intestinal
cells
Possible value adding of almond ‘waste’
products as pharmaceuticals.
Project AL13008
For more information contact:
Dr Michelle Wirthensohn, The University of
Adelaide
T 0427 526 473
E michelle.wirthensohn@adelaide.edu.au
Adoption of molecular techniques to
11
Remote
surveillance of
bee bait boxes
Bait boxes at Australian ports have
conventionally been inspected manually
by apiary officers for the presence of bees.
A proof-of-concept remote surveillance
technology was developed in a previous
project (MT10063) that used a smartphone to
capture and analyse images within a bait box
and generate an alert when a swarm of bees
was detected. Two remote surveillance bait
boxes were trialled successfully throughout
2012/2013.
A new project is trialling a further twenty
remote surveillance bait boxes at ports
around Australia, with additional refinements
to accommodate the larger deployment and
the anticipated ongoing deployment after the
project. The refinements include development
of the notification protocol and web interface
for monitoring alerts generated by the remote
surveillance bait boxes. Final evaluations,
system specifications and the identification
of potential commercial deliverers will be
completed by September.
This project will enable improved surveillance
for honeybee pests that could enter Australia
by cargo movements at ports.
Project MT13028
Dr Cheryl McCarthy, National Centre for
Engineering in Agriculture
T 07 4631 2297
E cheryl.mcCarthy@usq.edu.au
Top: Controlled swarm inside the bait box. Bottom: A bait box with remote camera surveillance,
Port of Brisbane, QLD.
Attracting and retaining young professionals in
horticulture
A well-documented shortfall of skilled
professional personnel exists to meet future
needs in horticulture. The Primary Industry
Centre for Science Education’s (PICSE)
experiential program re-directs bright young
people towards a range of research, advisory
and managerial horticultural industry and
science-based careers. It directly connects
Year 10-12 students and teachers with
professional personnel working in innovative
careers in the primary industries sector
12
through its network of Activity Centres (ACs),
staffed by professional Science Education
Officers (SEOs).
The program continues during 2014 with an
option to expand during 2015 with potential
engagement of other horticultural industries.
The banana and almond industries support
the program in southern Queensland and
South Australia and feature in PICSE Science
Class Engagement, Investigation Awards;
Industry Placements and Camps; Teacher
Professional Development/resources
development and Industry Internships.
Project MT11006
For more information contact:
Gordon Stone, PICSE
T 0408 063 229
E gordon@cdi.net.au
OBJECTIVE 4
Provide a supportive operating environment
Phil Watters
Award
James Callipari, a passionate fourth
generation farmer from Griffith, was the
winning recipient of the 2013 Phil Watters
Award. James was presented the award in
a ceremony at the 2013 Australian Almond
Conference.
James has used the prize to fund travels
abroad where he investigated more advanced
production systems that have the potential
to deliver an earlier and more attractive
return on investment through increased
yield, improved quality and reduced costs of
production.
The Phil Watters Award recognises service to
the Australian almond industry – in particular,
a dedication to research, development and
the improvement of almond production,
adoption of best practice and promotion of
horticulture to the community.
The Phil Watters Award includes a bursary of
$10,000 and is presented every two years.
Project AL09017
For more information contact:
Ben Brown, Almond Board of Australia
T 08 8582 2055
E bbrown@australianalmonds.com.au
Educating health professionals
about the health benefits of
almond consumption
An important project is focusing on
educating key health professionals on the
value of almonds in a healthy daily diet.
and assisting in the prevention of Type 2
diabetes have been published in major
nutrition journals.
The project’s rationale is to research
the nutritional benefits of almonds and
educate dieticians, GPs and fitness trainers
accordingly.
By partnering with two important
organisations, the Dietitians Association of
Australia and Sports Dietitians Australia,
the project has been able to credibly
educate Australian GP’s, dieticians and
fitness trainers in relation to the on-going
scientific discoveries.
The activity is a key component of the
industry’s strategic plan for growing almond
consumption.
The project collaborates with local nutrition
researchers in a number of leading
Australian universities, as well as leveraging
the findings of major research studies
undertaken around the world. Over the past
two years, important results linking almond
consumption with improved heart health
For more information contact:
Joseph Ebbage, Almond Board of Australia
T 08 8582 2055
E jebbage@australianalmonds.com.au
Australian almond industry
communications
The Australian almond industry is recognised
as one that cooperates across the supply
chain to develop the industry. Critical to this
shared vision for the industry’s future, based
on the development and implementation
of the industry strategic plan, is a broad
awareness and understanding of the
initiatives being considered and undertaken.
The communication project utilises a
number of media to achieve this widespread
recognition by industry participants that
include: producers, processors, marketers,
suppliers, researchers, government and the
broader community.
2013 Phil Watters Award recipient, James
Callipari.
Project AL12001
In addition, the industry supply chain
committees involving over 60 members
provide an excellent way to keep the flow of
information happening in a structured way.
Project AL11005
For more information contact:
Ross Skinner, Almond Board of Australia
T 08 8582 2055
E rskinner@australianalmonds.com.au
The ABA website is in the process of being
upgraded and the use of blogs and youtube
video will feature. The industry magazine,
In a Nutshell is produced quarterly and
complements the face-to-face engagement
with industry at field days, research forums,
regional meetings and conferences.
Facebook, Twitter and e-blasts are all being
utilised to facilitate communication.
13
Australian almond industry liaison
and extension
To keep industry stakeholders informed
and to help them make better business
decisions, an industry capacity building
project is designed to provide a mechanism
for sharing past, current and future R&D
outcomes. The project is a major vehicle
for the implementation of the industry’s
strategic R&D plan.
The project includes an Industry
Development Manager (IDM) and an
Industry Development Officer (IDO), who
is responsible for undertaking a variety of
activities.
The project team has consulted with
industry and other key stakeholders to
identify issues and there have been a
number of valuable activities delivered from
this project, including:
•
Detailed R&D strategies developed
•
Gaps required to achieve the R&D
strategies identified
•
R&D project scoping and development
•
R&D project support and delivery of
R&D outputs ensured
•
R&D projects undertaken as needs
arise
•
Assistance in implementing the
strategies that achieve industry
outcomes through extension and
technology transfer.
In particular, the project has recently been
actively involved in: various stakeholder
consultation activities; management
of the industry’s budwood repositories;
implementation of an almond rootstock
field evaluation trial; rapid screening
almond rootstock susceptibility to root
knot nematode tolerance; evaluation
of new Australian and overseas scion
varieties; development of an almond
version of OrchardNet®, an internet based
orchard management tool; two visiting
almond researchers from the University
of California; tree canopy spray coverage
trials and workshops; chemical use permits;
multimedia capture; an R&D Forum; various
field days; and technical support and
communication to industry stakeholders.
These activities have facilitated: the
development of new R&D program, learning
by members of the industry, adoption
of new technologies and management
practices, and provided tailored
publications and extension services.
Project AL12000
For more information contact:
Ben Brown, Almond Board of Australia
T 08 8582 2055
E bbrown@australianalmonds.com.au
Study tour of
Spain
Eleven industry delegates participated in a
two-week study tour during May and June,
investigating the Spanish almond industry.
Spain is the third-largest producer of
almonds and is recognised as having unique
characteristics and strengths that could be
used to improve productivity in Australia.
The tour focused its investigations towards:
•
Learning about new Spanish cultivars
and rootstocks that have been either
recently imported to Australia or require
evaluation to determine whether
importation is required
•
Almond training and architecture
systems for higher density orchard
systems
•
Size controlling rootstocks and other
rootstock evaluations
•
Over-the-row, shake and catch harvesting
of almond trees
•
Drying systems used for harvesting
‘green’ fruit
•
Tissue culturing and micro-grafting
nursery facilities
•
Liaising with international colleagues
regarding general orchard management
practices
•
Meeting with local almond growers
to compare growing conditions and
techniques
•
Building capacity and skills within the
Australia almond industry.
Project AL13701
For more information contact:
Ben Brown, Almond Board of Australia
T 08 8582 2055
E bbrown@australianalmonds.com.au
14
INVESTING IN AUSTRALIAN
HORTICULTURE
Australian Government priorities
As part of the Australian Government’s
commitment to rural research and
development (R&D), horticulture industries
can access matching Commonwealth funding
though Horticulture Australia Limited (HAL) for
all R&D activities.
The Australian Government’s Rural R&D
Priorities aim to foster innovation and guide
R&D effort in the face of continuing economic,
environmental and social change. HAL’s
operations are closely aligned with these
priorities.
This chart shows the percentage of
expenditure in HAL’s almond industry R&D
program against each of the Australian
Government priorities for rural R&D. Full
details of expenditure across all industries is
available in HAL’s annual report at
www.horticulture.com.au
Innovation skills (7.97%)
Biosecurity (5.69%)
Climate variability and climate change (2.26%)
Natural resources management (8.26%)
Productivity and adding value (33.29%)
Supply chain and markets (37.61%)
Improve the productivity and profitability
of existing industries and support the
development of viable new industries.
Climate variability and
climate change
Build resilience to climate variability and
adapt to and investigate the effects of
climate change.
Supply chain and markets
Better understand and respond to domestic
and international markets and consumer
requirements and improve the flow of
such information through the whole supply
chain, including to consumers.
Natural resource management
Support effective management of
Australia’s natural resources to ensure
primary industries are both economically
and environmentally sustainable.
The consultation agreement between ABA
and HAL sets out the tasks each organisation
will perform to enable the other to discharge
its responsibilities related to levy payers and
industry services.
Consultation agreement activities are funded
by HAL using the almond industry’s R&D
levy and matched funds from the Australian
Government.
These funds enable ABA to undertake the
Annual Levy Payers’ Meeting, conduct IAC
meetings, attend HAL Industry Forums, HAL/
ABA Executive Board to Board consultation
meetings, and other formal and informal
consultation between personnel of ABA and
HAL.
Technology (4.91%)
Productivity and adding value
Consultation funding
Biosecurity
Protect Australia’s community, primary
industries and environment from
biosecurity threats.
The full year consultation funding
expenditure for ABA in 2013/14
was $187,795. This represents 9.1
per cent of the total annual levy
expenditure.
Project AL13910
For more information contact:
Ross Skinner, Almond Board of Australia
T 08 8582 2055
E rskinner@australianalmonds.com.au
Innovation skills
Improve the skills to undertake research
and apply its findings.
Technology
Promote the development of new and
existing technologies.
HAL’s roles and relationships
Horticulture Australia Limited (HAL) is a not-for-profit industry owned company. Its role is to manage the expenditure of funds collected by the
Australian Government on behalf of horticulture industries. In 2013/14 HAL invested more than $100 million in projects to benefit horticulture
industries.
An Industry Advisory Committee (IAC) is established for each industry with a statutory levy and annual income exceeding $150,000.
The Prescribed Industry Body (PIB) for an industry is responsible for recommending to HAL the establishment of, and any changes to, statutory
levies. The PIB for an industry with a statutory levy recommends membership of the IAC to HAL and must demonstrate how the skills required
on an IAC are met by the persons they recommend for appointment to the committee.
For more information please visit www.horticulture.com.au
15
The almond industry contributes funding towards an across industry program that
addresses issues affecting all of horticulture. Details of the current program are
listed below. A full report of the program can be found at
www.horticulture.com.au/industries/across_industry_program.asp
ACROSS INDUSTRY PROGRAM
Project
no.
Rural R&D
priorities
Project title
Levy
or VC
Project
start
Project
finish
Life of project
value
2013/14
Organisation
expenditure
Contact
Objective 1: To enhance the efficiency, transparency, responsiveness and integrity of the supply chain
AH12009
Partnering fresh produce with retail:
quality assurance harmonisation –
phase I
Levy
1/08/12
31/08/13 $143,500
$212
Kitchener Partners
Tristan Kitchener
0407 827 738
AH12010
Partnering fresh produce with retail:
joint working groups
Levy
1/08/12
30/11/14 $305,000
$43,446
Kitchener Partners
Tristan Kitchener
0407 827 738
AH12015
Food innovation hub
Levy
09/05/13 31/08/13 $28,166
$5,633
Food Innovation Partners Russel Rankin
07 3289 4591
AH12016
Partnering fresh produce with retail:
quality assurance harmonisation –
phase II
Levy
15/05/13 30/06/15 $337,307
$105,096 Kitchener Partners
Tristan Kitchener
0407 827 738
AH13026
Retailer in-store training
Levy
16/12/13 30/05/14 $20,000
$20,000
Kitchener Partners
Tristan Kitchener
0407 827 738
Rural Industries R&D
Corporation
Margo Andrae
02 6271 4132
Objective 2: Maximise the health benefits of horticultural products
No active project in 2013/14 to report on.
Objective 3: Position horticulture to compete in a globalised environment
AH09027
Investing in youth successful
scholarship applicant
Levy
31/05/10 31/03/15 $80,000
$10,000
AH11009
Autonomous perception systems for
horticulture tree crops
Levy
01/05/12 27/11/15 $599,500
$120,000 The University of Sydney
Dr Salah
Sukkarieh
02 9351 8154
AH12019
Horticulture leaders - Across
Levy
Horticulture Leadership Training - 2013
and 2014 programs
03/06/13 31/05/15 $184,323
$50,000
Strategic Business
Development Pty Ltd
Russell Cummings
0414 929 585
AH13018
Horticulture R&D showcase
Levy
01/08/13 30/06/14 $46,889
35,680
Horticulture Australia
Limited
Brenda Kranz
02 8295 2317
AH13020
Horticulture Information Unit
Levy
01/08/13 28/02/16 $250,000
$31,000
Horticulture Australia
Limited
Pat Abraham
0438 474 758
AH13028
Australia Fresh - Across Industry
Initiative
Levy
16/12/13 30/12/14 $50,000
$44,789
Oliver & Doam
Agnes Barnard
02 8011 4743
MT12029
Horticultural Market Access Manager
2012 - 2015
VC/
Levy
01/10/12 30/09/15 $613,500
$74,839
Langley Consulting
Chris Langley
0498 723 103
Objective 4: Achieve long term viability and sustainability for Australian horticulture
AH09003
Plant protection: regulatory support
and coordination
Levy
1/07/09
AH09014
Across industry climate RD&E activities
Levy
AH10003
Horticulture component of the National
Climate Change Research Strategy for
Primary Industries
AH10006
$243,225 AKC Consulting Pty Ltd
Kevin Bodnaruk
02 9499 3833
13/04/10 28/02/14 $60,264
$12,000
Horticulture Australia
Limited
Brenda Kranz
02 8295 2317
Levy
30/11/11 01/07/15 $157,500
$0
Horticulture Australia
Limited
Brenda Kranz
02 8295 2317
Pesticide spray drift in horticulture:
a response to new guidelines from the
APVMA
Levy
1/07/10
$4,676
Horticulture Australia
Limited
Jodie Pedrana
0404 314 751
AH11007
Developing an LCI database for
Australian agriculture
Levy
02/01/12 01/10/13 $20,000
$10,000
Rural Industries R&D
Corporation
Brenda Kranz
02 8295 2317
AH11010
Biotechnology awareness in
horticulture
Levy
10/10/11 30/06/14 $102,177
$9,941
Horticulture Australia
Limited
Alok Kumar
0418 322 070
AH11011
Horticulture funding of the CRC for plant Levy
biosecurity
30/06/12 30/05/18 $3,000,000
$500,000 CRC for National Plant
Biosecurity
John Austin
02 6201 2882
AH11029
Provision of independent technical and
secretarial services to the National
Working Party for Pesticide Application
Levy
20/12/11 31/05/15 $100,000
$25,000
Plant Health Australia
Nicholas Woods
02 6215 7704
AH13014
Horticulture for Tomorrow Review &
Upgrade
Levy
05/08/13 23/06/14 $43,228
$43,196
Horticulture Australia
Limited
Brenda Kranz
02 8295 2317
16
30/05/14 $995,061
30/06/14 $20,000
Project
no.
Rural R&D
priorities
Project title
Levy
or VC
Project
start
Project
finish
Life of project
value
2013/14
Organisation
expenditure
Contact
AH13023
Industry Development Forum with
International Horticulture Congress
Levy
17/02/14 30/06/15 $45,100
$2,923
Horticulture Australia
Limited
David Low
0429 221 443
AH13025
Research to support HAL member input Levy
to the HAL Review
18/11/13 28/02/14 $43,399
$43,647
Horticulture Australia
Limited
John Madden
0421 274 076
AH13027
Plant protection: Regulatory support
and co-ordination
Levy
31/05/14 01/07/18 $892,748
$25,000
AKC Consulting Pty Ltd
Kevin Bodnaruk
02 9499 3833
AH13032
Response to Agricultural
Competitiveness White Paper
Levy
01/04/14 30/04/14 $31,500
$31,500
KPMG
Michelle Pawley
02 6248 1141
MT10029
Managing pesticide access in
horticulture
Levy
01/07/10 02/07/15 $1,261,460
$67,398
Horticulture Australia
Limited
Jodie Pedrana
0404 314 751
MT10049
A multi target approach to fruit spotting Levy
bug management
01/03/11 01/04/16 $1,353,016
$40,741
Department of Primary
Industries NSW
Ruth Huwer
02 6626 1196
MT10066
Project Coordination for MT10049
Levy
14/03/11 31/05/14 $42,984
$1,214
RCR Agri Pty Ltd
Chaseley Ross
0409 707 806
AH11003
Support function for AIC
Levy
15/09/11 30/08/13 $84,187
$35,000
Horticulture Australia
Limited
Warwick Scherf
02 8295 2323
AH11017
Sponsorship of Appetite for Excellence
Awards
Levy
01/07/11 22/06/14 $70,500
$20,000
Horticulture Australia
Limited
Melissa Smith
02 8295 2340
AH11023
Graham Gregory Award and Function
Levy
01/07/11 30/06/16 $151,500
$30,000
Horticulture Australia
Limited
Sharyn Casey
02 8295 2379
AH11026
Across industry program administration Levy
01/07/11 30/06/14 $31,800
$6,332
Horticulture Australia
Limited
Warwick Scherf
02 8295 2323
AH13800
Across Industry Annual Report
Levy
01/07/13 30/06/14 $15,000
$9,688
Horticulture Australia
Limited
Barabara
Knezevic-Marinos
02 8295 2318
MT12028
OHMA Operational Support 2012 to
2015
VC/
Levy
01/10/12 31/05/15 $91,500
$19,594
Horticulture Australia
Limited
Peter Whittle
0409 578 937
09/09/13 01/10/14 $500,000
$250,000 Intellectual Ventures
Paul Levins
0419 239 180
Dr Christopher
Hardy
02 6246 4375
Objective 5: Other
Horticulture Australia Transformational Fund Projects
AI12002
Transformational solutions to
challenges and issues facing the
Australian horticulture industry
Levy
AI13001
Dietary sterilization of male
Queensland Fruit Fly (QFF)
Levy
01/05/14 28/02/18 $1,253,316
$100,000 CSIRO Biosecurity
Flagship
AI13004
Transforming subtropical / tropical tree Levy
crop productivity
05/11/13 31/05/17 $3,089,012
$652,026
AI3008
A platform for the continuous genetic
improvement of accepted cultivars of
vegetatively propagated horticultural
crops
Levy
14/11/13 31/01/17 $2,025,439
$354,981 Queensland University of
Technology
Dr James Dale
07 3138 2819
AI13011
Transformational innovation
performance analysis
Levy
01/10/13 31/12/14 $146,635
$117,308
The University of
Queensland
A/Prof
Damian Hine
07 3346 8162
AI13012
A value chain approach to horticultural
product innovation
Levy
20/12/13 31/12/14 $265,430
$112,544
Central Queensland
University
Philip Brown
07 4150 7145
AI13012
Direction setting forum for a
horticultural education strategy
Levy
24/02/14 30/07/15 $15,000
$7,968
Horticulture Australia
Limited
Sharyn Casey
02 8295 2379
AI13014
Advancing Post Doctorates in
Horticulture
Levy
01/06/14 30/04/18 $800,000
$0
Horticulture Australia
Limited
Sharyn Casey
02 8295 2379
Australian Government Rural R&D Priorities: Productivity and adding value
Climate change and climate variability
Supply chain and markets
Biosecurity
The Department of
Dr John Wilkie
Agriculture, Fisheries and 0402 390 885
Forestry, Qld
Natural resource management
Innovation skills
Technology
17
ALMOND PROGRAM
Project no.
Industry Rural R&D
Obj.
priorities
Project title
Levy or
VC
Project start
Project finish
Life of project
value
2013/14
Organisation
expenditure
Contact
Levy program
Almond Board of
Australia
Ben Brown
08 8582 2055
$526,776 $105,355
CSIRO Sustainable
Agriculture Flagship
Dr Saul Cunningham
02 6246 4356
$486,350 $146,357
Almond Board of
Australia
Ross Skinner
08 8582 2055
AL09017
4
Phil Watters Award
VC
01/11/09
31/12/14
$30,000
AL11003
3
Enhancing almond pollination
efficiency
Levy
01/08/11
30/06/14
AL11005
4
Australian almond industry
communications
VC
01/09/11
31/08/14
AL11009
2
Food Safety in Almonds Stage 2
Levy
19/09/11
10/07/15
$1,040,383
AL11012
3
Evaluation of potential
Prunus rootstocks for almond
production
VC
01/07/11
30/05/16
$70,000
AL12000
4
Australian almond industry
liaison and extension project
Levy
16/08/12
AL12001
4
Research and education of
health professionals relating to
VC
the health benefits of almond
consumption
AL12003
2
AL12004
AL12006
$4,500
Department of
Dr Chin Gouk
$132,496 Environment and
03 9032 7306
Primary Industries, VIC
$0
Almond Board of
Australia
Ben Brown
08 8582 2055
15/08/15
$1,179,315 $313,589
Almond Board of
Australia
Ben Brown
08 8582 2055
01/03/13
31/08/15
$980,500 $334,200
Almond Board of
Australia
Joseph Ebbage
08 8582 2055
Advanced processing of
almonds
VC/Levy 19/09/12
01/03/17
$916,000 $170,000
University of South
Australia
A/Prof John Fielke
08 8302 3119
2
Managing Carob Moth in
almonds
VC/Levy 15/10/12
31/05/15
$591,697
3
Almond industry minor-use
allocation
Levy
01/07/12
31/05/15
$10,000
AL12010
3
Impact of strategic deficit
irrigation for almonds on tree
Levy
phenology, bloom, nut set and
hull rot
01/10/12
31/08/14
Department of
Dave Monks
$250,000 $104,000 Environment and
03 5051 4396
Primary Industries, VIC
AL12011
3
Monash remediation
Levy
02/10/12
20/07/15
$110,000
AL12015
3
Australian almond
variety evaluation and
commercialisation program
Levy
03/06/13
25/05/18
AL12016
1
Developing export markets for
Australian almonds
VC
17/06/13
30/07/16
$492,160
AL12701
1
Almond international
networking
Levy
19/04/13
30/05/15
AL12702
1
Australian Almond Industry
Conferences 2013 - 2015
VC
20/06/13
28/02/16
18
Department of
David Madge
$367,864 Environment and
0427 233 692
Primary Industries, VIC
$4,350
Horticulture Australia
Limited
Jodie Pedrana
0404 314 751
$25,290
Almond Board of
Australia
Ben Brown
08 8582 2055
$1,327,806 $253,930
The University of
Adelaide
Dr Michelle
Wirthensohn
0427 526 473
$43,011
Almond Board of
Australia
Ross Skinner
0448 049 202
$99,000
$30,000
Almond Board of
Australia
Ross Skinner
08 8582 2055
$300,000
$40,000
Almond Board of
Australia
Ross Skinner
08 8582 2055
ALMOND PROGRAM
Project no.
Industry Rural R&D
Obj.
priorities
Project title
Levy or
VC
Project start
Project finish
Life of project
value
2012/13
Organisation
expenditure
Dr Michelle
Wirthensohn
0427 526 473
AL13008
3
Molecular mapping, nutrition
and value adding of almonds
Levy
01/11/13
01/07/16
$57,000
AL13009
3
Better tree performance and
water use efficiency through
root system resilience
Levy
23/06/14
01/11/19
$1,281,979
AL13701
4
Australian almond industry
study tour of Spain
VC
24/02/14
30/06/14
$82,264
$70,560
AL13800
4
Almond Industry Annual Report
Levy
2012/13
01/07/13
30/06/14
$7,350
$8,850
AL13910
4
Almond Consultation Funding
Agreement 2013/14
01/11/13
31/10/14
$187,330
$187,330
4
Attracting and retaining young
VC/Levy 01/12/11
professionals in horticulture
30/11/14
$409,656
Primary Industry
Centre for Science
$20,000
Education, University
of Tasmania
MT12005
4
Development of molecular
diagnostic tools to detect
Levy
endemic and exotic pathogens
of Prunus species for Australia
03/10/12
31/07/15
$360,000
Department of
Dr Fiona Constable
$90,000 Environment and
03 9023 7326
Primary Industries, VIC
MT12010
2
Understanding the purchase
behaviour of fresh produce
consumers
VC/Levy 01/07/12
30/06/14
$1,023,359
MT12045
3
Submission to authorities in
Japan and Taiwan addressing
provisional MRL
Levy
26/03/13
31/05/15
$46,000
$3,910 AKC Consulting Pty Ltd
Kevin Bodnaruk
02 9499 3833
MT12049
3
A model for industry planning
and preparedness for an
incursion of Varroa mite
VC/Levy 17/06/13
30/05/15
$58,400
$1,542 Plant Health Australia
Brad Siebert
0417 653 128
MT13027
3
Understanding practice in key
pollination industries
VC/Levy 01/07/13
30/05/14
$45,000
$21,042 TQA Australia
Mark Leech
0487 386 833
MT13028
3
Deployment and refinement of
bait box remote surveillance
VC/Levy 01/11/13
system
01/09/14
$99,200
National Centre
$39,312 for Engineering in
Agriculture
Dr Cheryl McCarthy
07 4631 2297
MT11006
Levy
Australian Government Rural R&D Priorities: Productivity and adding value
Climate change and climate variability
Supply chain and markets
Biosecurity
$25,000
The University of
Adelaide
Contact
$0 CSIRO Plant Industry
$44,966
Dr Everard Edwards
0422 810 973
Almond Board of
Australia
Ben Brown
08 8582 2055
Horticulture Australia
Limited
Barbara KnezevicMarinos
02 8295 2318
Almond Board of
Australia
Stuart Burgess
02 8295 2300
Horticulture Australia
Limited
Gordon Stone
0408 063 229
David Chenu
02 8295 2381
Natural resource management
Innovation skills
Technology
CLIMATE CHANGE RD&E
Throughout 2013/14, the Australian horticulture industry invested in a range of research, development and extension (RD&E) projects to better
understand, adapt to and mitigate the impacts of climate change.
Horticulture Australia Limited (HAL) has invested in cross-collaborative programs, such as the Climate Change Research Strategy for Primary
Industries (CCRSPI) and Agricultural Lifecycle Inventory (AusAgLCI), and projects within or across industries, such as on crop phenology, nitrogen
and plant-waste management, regulated deficit irrigation, carbon and soil, urban forestry and environmental auditing.
HAL’s RD&E investment is obtained through industry levies, voluntary contributions and matched funds by the Australian Government.
19
ALMOND INVESTMENT
SUMMARY
Marketing
R&D
Combined
2013/ 2014
2013/ 2014
2013/14
$
$
$
53,977
53,977
Levies Received
1,359,559
1,359,559
Commonwealth Contributions
1,017,689
1,017,689
Other Income
17,144
17,144
Total Income
2,394,392
2,394,392
Budget
2,536,108
2,536,108
-141,716
-141,716
1,790,460
1,790,460
218,694
218,694
Across Industry Contribution
44,491
44,491
Levy Collection Costs
10,025
10,025
Total Investment
2,063,670
2,063,670
Budget
2,254,818
2,254,818
Variance to budget
191,148
191,148
Annual Surplus/Deficit
330,722
330,722
Closing Balance 30 June 2014
384,699
384,699
Year ended 30 June 2014
Funds available 1 July 2013
INCOME
Variance to budget
PROGRAM INVESTMENT
Levy Programs
Service Delivery Programs by HAL
Almond Industry Advisory
Committee (IAC)
For more information contact:
Dr Greg Buchanan (Chair)
Neale Bennett
Domenic Cavallaro
Denis Dinicola
Damien Houlahan
Graham Johns
Andrew Lacey
Paul Martin
Tim Millen
Nigel Carey
Brendan Sidhu
Laurence Van Driel
Stuart Burgess (Ex-Officio)
Ross Skinner (Ex-Officio)
Stuart Burgess
HAL Industry Services Team Support
Manager
Horticulture Australia Limited
262 Argyle Street
Hobart TAS 7000
T 0417 536 300
E stuart.burgess@horticulture.com.au
Horticulture Australia Limited (HAL) Level 7, 179 Elizabeth Street Sydney NSW 2000 T 02 8295 2300 F 02 8295 2399 www.horticulture.com.au
20
21
Almond Board of Australia Inc.
ABN 31 709 079 099
9 William Street, PO Box 2246
Berri South Australia 5343
P + 61 8 8582 2055
E admin@australianalmonds.com.au
W www.australianalmonds.com.au
The Almond Board of Australia Annual Report 2013/14
can be downloaded from www.australianalmonds.com.au
22
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